CRF activates autonomic nervous system and reduces natural killer cytotoxicity

CRF activates autonomic nervous system and reduces natural killer cytotoxicity METHODS SUBSTANTIAL EVIDENCE has demonstrated that stressinducing stimuli are associated with a suppression (1). However, there is little direct evidence to forge the link between the central nervous system and the system, even though the brain is capable communicating with cells via direct nervous innervation lymphoid tissues (15). For example, noradrenergic fibers the sympathetic nervous system innervate the spleen in which lymphocytes reside (4-6, 15, 24). Lymphocytes have receptors for norepinephrine and epinephrine (7, 8), and these catecholamines can inhibit natural killer cell (NK) cytotoxicity (9), an parameter important in host defense against virally infected and tumor cells (10). Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) initiates biological actions within the brain that are observed in response to stress, including effects on behavior (2, 22), the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (19,23), and the autonomic nervous system (3). Recently Irwin et al. (12) showed that splenic NK cytotoxicity is reduced after intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration CRF in 0363-6119/M $1.50 Copyright Subjects. Male Wistar albino rats (Charles River) weighing 250-300 g were housed in groups three before experimentation in constant-room-temperature animal facilities. They had continuous access to water and food. Animals were handled daily for a 5min period to allow for sufficient habituation to handling and manipulation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology The American Physiological Society

CRF activates autonomic nervous system and reduces natural killer cytotoxicity

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6119
eISSN
1522-1490
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

METHODS SUBSTANTIAL EVIDENCE has demonstrated that stressinducing stimuli are associated with a suppression (1). However, there is little direct evidence to forge the link between the central nervous system and the system, even though the brain is capable communicating with cells via direct nervous innervation lymphoid tissues (15). For example, noradrenergic fibers the sympathetic nervous system innervate the spleen in which lymphocytes reside (4-6, 15, 24). Lymphocytes have receptors for norepinephrine and epinephrine (7, 8), and these catecholamines can inhibit natural killer cell (NK) cytotoxicity (9), an parameter important in host defense against virally infected and tumor cells (10). Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) initiates biological actions within the brain that are observed in response to stress, including effects on behavior (2, 22), the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (19,23), and the autonomic nervous system (3). Recently Irwin et al. (12) showed that splenic NK cytotoxicity is reduced after intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration CRF in 0363-6119/M $1.50 Copyright Subjects. Male Wistar albino rats (Charles River) weighing 250-300 g were housed in groups three before experimentation in constant-room-temperature animal facilities. They had continuous access to water and food. Animals were handled daily for a 5min period to allow for sufficient habituation to handling and manipulation

Journal

AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Nov 1, 1988

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