Contraction-induced injury to single fiber segments from fast and slow muscles of rats by single stretches

Contraction-induced injury to single fiber segments from fast and slow muscles of rats by single... deficit provides the best measure the magnitude , during a series repeated stretches contracting muscles, the loss in force is rapid and pround (19, 22). This rapid and pround loss in force may arise from fatigue, including failure the excitation-coupling (E-C) process (2, 30), as well as focal damage to sarcomeres, and possibly to the sarcoplasmic reticulum. As a consequence, immediately after repeated contractions, an interpretation the initial mechanism based on the force deficit may be compromised. In addition to the potential problem “fatigue,” interpretations regarding the mechanical factors responsible for the initiation to whole muscles are compromised by the complexity muscle architecture (7), the focal nature the (6,22,25,26), and the apparent greater susceptibility fast compared with slow muscle fibers to develop an (5,16,19,29). To resolve these issues, our experimental design combined a protocol single stretches (3) with a single permeabilized muscle fiber preparation. Under these circumstances, the complexity whole muscle architecture is removed, precise measures the forces developed can be made in the absence fatigue, and the sites ultrastructural damage can be identified and evaluated without intervening events. Despite the advantages this preparation, the force deficits produced following single stretches permeabilized fiber segments do not address possible http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Cell Physiology The American Physiological Society

Contraction-induced injury to single fiber segments from fast and slow muscles of rats by single stretches

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6143
eISSN
1522-1563
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

deficit provides the best measure the magnitude , during a series repeated stretches contracting muscles, the loss in force is rapid and pround (19, 22). This rapid and pround loss in force may arise from fatigue, including failure the excitation-coupling (E-C) process (2, 30), as well as focal damage to sarcomeres, and possibly to the sarcoplasmic reticulum. As a consequence, immediately after repeated contractions, an interpretation the initial mechanism based on the force deficit may be compromised. In addition to the potential problem “fatigue,” interpretations regarding the mechanical factors responsible for the initiation to whole muscles are compromised by the complexity muscle architecture (7), the focal nature the (6,22,25,26), and the apparent greater susceptibility fast compared with slow muscle fibers to develop an (5,16,19,29). To resolve these issues, our experimental design combined a protocol single stretches (3) with a single permeabilized muscle fiber preparation. Under these circumstances, the complexity whole muscle architecture is removed, precise measures the forces developed can be made in the absence fatigue, and the sites ultrastructural damage can be identified and evaluated without intervening events. Despite the advantages this preparation, the force deficits produced following single stretches permeabilized fiber segments do not address possible

Journal

AJP - Cell PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Nov 1, 1996

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