An electromyographic study of elbow motion during postexercise muscle soreness

An electromyographic study of elbow motion during postexercise muscle soreness MUSCLE SORENESS (PEMS),the familiar stiffness and soreness that occurs a day or two after intense exercise to which we are unaccustomed, has been the subject of a number of studies. The elegant study of concentric vs. eccentric work by Asmussen (2) showed that this soreness resulted not from accumulation of products of mabolic turnover but, rather, from mechanical changes linked to the stresses associated with the exercise. It corroborated Hough’s theory of microtearing (7). The suggestion of DeVries (6) that muscle spasm is involved in a primary way has not been borne out by subsequent electromyographic (EMG) studies (1, 10, 11). Asmussen’s suggestion that the soreness is caused by connective tissue changes at the myotendinal junctions, which he based on palpatory findings by physical therapists, has received some support from the report of Abraham (1) of changes in hydroxyproline excrion patterns that correlate with the time course of soreness. POSTEXERCISE 0161-7567/85 $1.50 Choice of subjects and preliminary examination. The subjects were healthy young adults found upon physical examination to be free of any abnormal restriction of motion or abnormal tissue texture in the upper body. The strength (peak torque) of the elbow flexors of each subject was dermined http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

An electromyographic study of elbow motion during postexercise muscle soreness

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

MUSCLE SORENESS (PEMS),the familiar stiffness and soreness that occurs a day or two after intense exercise to which we are unaccustomed, has been the subject of a number of studies. The elegant study of concentric vs. eccentric work by Asmussen (2) showed that this soreness resulted not from accumulation of products of mabolic turnover but, rather, from mechanical changes linked to the stresses associated with the exercise. It corroborated Hough’s theory of microtearing (7). The suggestion of DeVries (6) that muscle spasm is involved in a primary way has not been borne out by subsequent electromyographic (EMG) studies (1, 10, 11). Asmussen’s suggestion that the soreness is caused by connective tissue changes at the myotendinal junctions, which he based on palpatory findings by physical therapists, has received some support from the report of Abraham (1) of changes in hydroxyproline excrion patterns that correlate with the time course of soreness. POSTEXERCISE 0161-7567/85 $1.50 Choice of subjects and preliminary examination. The subjects were healthy young adults found upon physical examination to be free of any abnormal restriction of motion or abnormal tissue texture in the upper body. The strength (peak torque) of the elbow flexors of each subject was dermined

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: May 1, 1985

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