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Vivian Castleberry: An Editor Ahead of Her Time

Vivian Castleberry: An Editor Ahead of Her Time Vivian Castleberry in her role as “women’s editor” for the Texas A&M University student newspaper, the Battalion, in the 1950s. Courtesy the Cushing Memorial Library and Archives at Texas A&M University. Vivian Castleberr y: An Editor ahead of Her Time Kimberly Wilmot Voss* hen the second wave of the women’s movement began in the W 1960s, Dallas Times Herald women’s page editor Vivian Castleberry immediately sensed its importance. She started using the term “Ms.,” which symbolized women’s independence, in her section’s stories. She continued to do so for the next v fi e years until the industry magazine Editor & Publisher printed part of a speech she gave about the practice. The following day her editors gave her written notice that she had to stop and instead use “Miss” or “Mrs.” The editors had not been reading her section closely enough to notice the difference in terminology. This lack of attention followed by criticism was symbolic of the relationship Castleberry had with her editors as she sought to modernize her pages. She said: My staff would prod me to do more. The community was prodding me to do more. My management was sometimes looking askance at what I was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Vivian Castleberry: An Editor Ahead of Her Time

Southwestern Historical Quarterly , Volume 110 (4) – Jun 11, 2007

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560

Abstract

Vivian Castleberry in her role as “women’s editor” for the Texas A&M University student newspaper, the Battalion, in the 1950s. Courtesy the Cushing Memorial Library and Archives at Texas A&M University. Vivian Castleberr y: An Editor ahead of Her Time Kimberly Wilmot Voss* hen the second wave of the women’s movement began in the W 1960s, Dallas Times Herald women’s page editor Vivian Castleberry immediately sensed its importance. She started using the term “Ms.,” which symbolized women’s independence, in her section’s stories. She continued to do so for the next v fi e years until the industry magazine Editor & Publisher printed part of a speech she gave about the practice. The following day her editors gave her written notice that she had to stop and instead use “Miss” or “Mrs.” The editors had not been reading her section closely enough to notice the difference in terminology. This lack of attention followed by criticism was symbolic of the relationship Castleberry had with her editors as she sought to modernize her pages. She said: My staff would prod me to do more. The community was prodding me to do more. My management was sometimes looking askance at what I was

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Jun 11, 2007

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