Thunder across the Swamp: The Fight for the Lower Mississippi, February 1863–May 1863 (review)

Thunder across the Swamp: The Fight for the Lower Mississippi, February 1863–May 1863 (review) Southwestern Historical Quarterly October three years, and then Houston returned to office. Given these circumstances, it was nearly impossible for department heads, bureau chiefs, or military commanders to know which policies will become continuous and span administrations or which ones will effectively die after an election. Into such political uncertainty came Edwin W. Moore, a Virginian and experienced sailor in the United States Navy. In 1839, Lamar appointed Moore to command Texas's eight-ship navy. As commodore, Moore was to protect Texas's Gulf Coast--critical to growing the Texas economy--from Mexican raiders. Lamar would use that booming economy to open a corridor from Texas to the Pacific. If Moore could use the navy to support rebellious federalist states in Mexico and keep its Centralists (who remained in a state of war with Texas) busy, all the better. But in 1841, Houston returned to the presidency, and he swept out Lamar's nationalist plans. Houston had always wanted Texas to join the United States. He cared nothing about Texas expansion, and he certainly cared little about its navy. He saw it as a drain on Texas' strained budget, and he often refused to pay for expensive expeditions or upkeep on the ships. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Thunder across the Swamp: The Fight for the Lower Mississippi, February 1863–May 1863 (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 116 (2) – Sep 16, 2012

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
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Abstract

Southwestern Historical Quarterly October three years, and then Houston returned to office. Given these circumstances, it was nearly impossible for department heads, bureau chiefs, or military commanders to know which policies will become continuous and span administrations or which ones will effectively die after an election. Into such political uncertainty came Edwin W. Moore, a Virginian and experienced sailor in the United States Navy. In 1839, Lamar appointed Moore to command Texas's eight-ship navy. As commodore, Moore was to protect Texas's Gulf Coast--critical to growing the Texas economy--from Mexican raiders. Lamar would use that booming economy to open a corridor from Texas to the Pacific. If Moore could use the navy to support rebellious federalist states in Mexico and keep its Centralists (who remained in a state of war with Texas) busy, all the better. But in 1841, Houston returned to the presidency, and he swept out Lamar's nationalist plans. Houston had always wanted Texas to join the United States. He cared nothing about Texas expansion, and he certainly cared little about its navy. He saw it as a drain on Texas' strained budget, and he often refused to pay for expensive expeditions or upkeep on the ships.

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Sep 16, 2012

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