Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“The Most Turbulent and Most Traumatic Years in Recent Mexican-American History”: Police Violence and the Civil Rights Struggle in 1970s Texas

“The Most Turbulent and Most Traumatic Years in Recent Mexican-American History”: Police... The cartoon in the May 5, 1979, edition of El Cuhamil, the paper of the Texas Farm Workers’ Union, perfectly encapsulates the fear among many Mexican Americans of police officers. Here, a giant Anglo lawman brandishes a spiked club that reads “USA Democracy” and holds in his other hand a small, strangled Mexican American striker. Portrayed as the ver y epitome of an uneducated bigot, the officer tells an apparently uncurious journalist that “‘We’re Heah’ to Preevent Vilance.’” His belt buckle reads, “No Place But Texas.” Chicano Collection, Librar y Archives and Special Collections, the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. 2009 Article 33 “The Most Turbulent and Most Traumatic Years in Recent Mexican-American Histor y”: Police Violence and the Civil Rights Struggle in 1970s Texas By Brent M. S. Campney* here is] an old West Texas ethnic joke that Lubbock State “ Rep. Froy Salinas remembers well from his childhood,” the TDallas Morning News reported in one of many columns on police violence against Mexican Americans in the Lone Star State in the 1970s. In repeating Salinas’s “joke,” the Morning News used an ellipsis to signal the transition from the setup to the three-word punchline: “Texas Rangers all http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

“The Most Turbulent and Most Traumatic Years in Recent Mexican-American History”: Police Violence and the Civil Rights Struggle in 1970s Texas

Southwestern Historical Quarterly , Volume 122 (1) – Jul 12, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/texas-state-historical-association/the-most-turbulent-and-most-traumatic-years-in-recent-mexican-american-sEt7A2vAyZ
Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560

Abstract

The cartoon in the May 5, 1979, edition of El Cuhamil, the paper of the Texas Farm Workers’ Union, perfectly encapsulates the fear among many Mexican Americans of police officers. Here, a giant Anglo lawman brandishes a spiked club that reads “USA Democracy” and holds in his other hand a small, strangled Mexican American striker. Portrayed as the ver y epitome of an uneducated bigot, the officer tells an apparently uncurious journalist that “‘We’re Heah’ to Preevent Vilance.’” His belt buckle reads, “No Place But Texas.” Chicano Collection, Librar y Archives and Special Collections, the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. 2009 Article 33 “The Most Turbulent and Most Traumatic Years in Recent Mexican-American Histor y”: Police Violence and the Civil Rights Struggle in 1970s Texas By Brent M. S. Campney* here is] an old West Texas ethnic joke that Lubbock State “ Rep. Froy Salinas remembers well from his childhood,” the TDallas Morning News reported in one of many columns on police violence against Mexican Americans in the Lone Star State in the 1970s. In repeating Salinas’s “joke,” the Morning News used an ellipsis to signal the transition from the setup to the three-word punchline: “Texas Rangers all

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Jul 12, 2018

There are no references for this article.