The Latest Word from 1540: People, Places, and Portrayals of the Coronado Expedition (review)

The Latest Word from 1540: People, Places, and Portrayals of the Coronado Expedition (review) Book Reviews Cook-Lynn's treatment of an incident from the Santee War of 1862 examine available source material, pointing out biases that occur in the vocabulary of Eurocentric writers (for example, calling the war a "rebellion" or "breakout"). Others such as Matthew Jones's account of an early encounter of Otoe and Misouria peoples with Euro-Americans illustrate alternative ways of presenting narrative history­in Jones's case, using Native language as extensively as possible. Winona Stevenson shows how examining Indigenous sources produces a counter-narrative to historical accounts that rely solely on Eurocentric documents. Leanne Simpson demonstrates the importance of Indigenous terminology for abstractions that undergird interactions between local and colonial governments. Several of the essays take up contested issues in Indian-white relations, especially concerns about land access and ownership, repercussions of competing definitions of criminality, and appropriation for "scientific" study of Native property including human remains. Vine Deloria Jr. provides an overview of the relationship between sovereignty and claims to Indian lands, while Donna Akers examines the particulars of land ownership concepts as related to removal of Choctaws from their traditional homeland. Steven J. Crum shows how both the written record and Native oral history support Shoshone land claims in Nevada. James http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

The Latest Word from 1540: People, Places, and Portrayals of the Coronado Expedition (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 116 (2) – Sep 16, 2012

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews Cook-Lynn's treatment of an incident from the Santee War of 1862 examine available source material, pointing out biases that occur in the vocabulary of Eurocentric writers (for example, calling the war a "rebellion" or "breakout"). Others such as Matthew Jones's account of an early encounter of Otoe and Misouria peoples with Euro-Americans illustrate alternative ways of presenting narrative history­in Jones's case, using Native language as extensively as possible. Winona Stevenson shows how examining Indigenous sources produces a counter-narrative to historical accounts that rely solely on Eurocentric documents. Leanne Simpson demonstrates the importance of Indigenous terminology for abstractions that undergird interactions between local and colonial governments. Several of the essays take up contested issues in Indian-white relations, especially concerns about land access and ownership, repercussions of competing definitions of criminality, and appropriation for "scientific" study of Native property including human remains. Vine Deloria Jr. provides an overview of the relationship between sovereignty and claims to Indian lands, while Donna Akers examines the particulars of land ownership concepts as related to removal of Choctaws from their traditional homeland. Steven J. Crum shows how both the written record and Native oral history support Shoshone land claims in Nevada. James

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Sep 16, 2012

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