“The Hope of the South”: The New Century Cotton Mill of Dallas, Texas, and the Business of Race in the New South, 1902–1907

“The Hope of the South”: The New Century Cotton Mill of Dallas, Texas, and the Business of... Figure 1: New Century Mill, c. 1905, from Detail of 1905 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map #44. Source: Sanborn Map Company, 1905 Sanford Fire Insurance Map, Dallas No. 44, in Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps­Texas (1877­1922), Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection, [Accessed Nov. 1, 2011]. Courtesy of the University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin. By Shennette Garrett-Scott* ew South apostle Henry W. Grady's invitation to speak on "Texas Day" at the 1888 Texas State Fair in Dallas had come at the last minute. A group of young businessmen pressed fair organizers to extend an invitation to Grady about a month before opening day. The persistent, ambitious young men recruited the prestigious Dallas Commercial Club to their cause and after some prodding the fair organizers finally extended an invitation to Grady. The editor of the Atlanta Constitution had made a name for himself throughout the United States by stressing a new economic direction for the South. Combining fiery rhetoric and dynamic oratory, Grady advocated increased industrialization and scientific agriculture as a way to rebuild the war-ravaged South and to modernize the southern economy. He imagined a peaceful--and profitable--reconciliation with the South's northern neighbors and between whites and former http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

“The Hope of the South”: The New Century Cotton Mill of Dallas, Texas, and the Business of Race in the New South, 1902–1907

Loading next page...
 
/lp/texas-state-historical-association/the-hope-of-the-south-the-new-century-cotton-mill-of-dallas-texas-and-r0RtFXLsj0
Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Figure 1: New Century Mill, c. 1905, from Detail of 1905 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map #44. Source: Sanborn Map Company, 1905 Sanford Fire Insurance Map, Dallas No. 44, in Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps­Texas (1877­1922), Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection, [Accessed Nov. 1, 2011]. Courtesy of the University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin. By Shennette Garrett-Scott* ew South apostle Henry W. Grady's invitation to speak on "Texas Day" at the 1888 Texas State Fair in Dallas had come at the last minute. A group of young businessmen pressed fair organizers to extend an invitation to Grady about a month before opening day. The persistent, ambitious young men recruited the prestigious Dallas Commercial Club to their cause and after some prodding the fair organizers finally extended an invitation to Grady. The editor of the Atlanta Constitution had made a name for himself throughout the United States by stressing a new economic direction for the South. Combining fiery rhetoric and dynamic oratory, Grady advocated increased industrialization and scientific agriculture as a way to rebuild the war-ravaged South and to modernize the southern economy. He imagined a peaceful--and profitable--reconciliation with the South's northern neighbors and between whites and former

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Sep 16, 2012

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off