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The Gulf of Mexico: A Maritime History by John S. Sledge (review)

The Gulf of Mexico: A Maritime History by John S. Sledge (review) 2009 Article 81 Book Reviews Nancy Baker Jones, Editor The Gulf of Mexico: A Maritime History. By John S. Sledge. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2019. Pp. 280. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index.) The Gulf of Mexico, the earth’s tenth largest body of water, laps the coast of the southern United States and connects it to Central and South America. As such, the Gulf represents an important nexus where people, empires, and trade intersect to defi ne modern geopolitical boundaries. John Sledge’s maritime histor y of the Gulf provides us with a broad sur vey of the Gulf’s importance to human history. By exploring how people, ships, and cities have interacted and developed, he has offered a well- written and riveting history that foretells the continuing importance of the Gulf of Mexico. Beginning with the Gulf’s pre-history, Sledge details the rich Native American, Spanish, French, English, American, and Confederate stories that comprise the fabric of this region. Situated at the western end of the Gulf with a coast that stretches 367 miles, Texas joins the story during Sledge’s explanation of the coastal landscape at the time of LaSalle’s 1684–86 expedition, the Mexican and Texas independence movements, and the Confederate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

The Gulf of Mexico: A Maritime History by John S. Sledge (review)

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560

Abstract

2009 Article 81 Book Reviews Nancy Baker Jones, Editor The Gulf of Mexico: A Maritime History. By John S. Sledge. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2019. Pp. 280. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index.) The Gulf of Mexico, the earth’s tenth largest body of water, laps the coast of the southern United States and connects it to Central and South America. As such, the Gulf represents an important nexus where people, empires, and trade intersect to defi ne modern geopolitical boundaries. John Sledge’s maritime histor y of the Gulf provides us with a broad sur vey of the Gulf’s importance to human history. By exploring how people, ships, and cities have interacted and developed, he has offered a well- written and riveting history that foretells the continuing importance of the Gulf of Mexico. Beginning with the Gulf’s pre-history, Sledge details the rich Native American, Spanish, French, English, American, and Confederate stories that comprise the fabric of this region. Situated at the western end of the Gulf with a coast that stretches 367 miles, Texas joins the story during Sledge’s explanation of the coastal landscape at the time of LaSalle’s 1684–86 expedition, the Mexican and Texas independence movements, and the Confederate

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Jul 3, 2020

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