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The Cabiness Family Lynching: Race, War, and Memory in Walker County, Texas

The Cabiness Family Lynching: Race, War, and Memory in Walker County, Texas The lynching of the Cabiness family of Walker County, Texas, is noted on the front page (“Negro Family is Killed by Posse”—a subheading states that “Women Join in Battle”) of the June 2, 1918, Temple Daily Telegram along with several stories related to World War I. The Cabiness Family Lynching: Race, War, and Memor y in Walker County, Texas By Jeffrey L. Littlejohn with Charles Ford, Jami Horne, and Briana Weaver* don’t know for sure that this is true,” Thomas Anders, a “ native of Walker County, Texas, reported in his manuscript, Memoirs I of a Country Boy, “but I heard that there were two colored brothers who supposedly roughed up one of the members of the Draft Board . . . during World War I.” The black youngsters intended to teach the local draft officer a lesson, but, before they could, “a bunch of [white] men . . . went out to where the brothers lived, and . . . shot ’em.” It was a brutal kill- ing, Anders recalled. The white mob “forced ’em into the[ir] house” and “burned the[ir] whole family—men, women, and children.” The murder of the Cabiness family proved so traumatic, in fact, that, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

The Cabiness Family Lynching: Race, War, and Memory in Walker County, Texas

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560

Abstract

The lynching of the Cabiness family of Walker County, Texas, is noted on the front page (“Negro Family is Killed by Posse”—a subheading states that “Women Join in Battle”) of the June 2, 1918, Temple Daily Telegram along with several stories related to World War I. The Cabiness Family Lynching: Race, War, and Memor y in Walker County, Texas By Jeffrey L. Littlejohn with Charles Ford, Jami Horne, and Briana Weaver* don’t know for sure that this is true,” Thomas Anders, a “ native of Walker County, Texas, reported in his manuscript, Memoirs I of a Country Boy, “but I heard that there were two colored brothers who supposedly roughed up one of the members of the Draft Board . . . during World War I.” The black youngsters intended to teach the local draft officer a lesson, but, before they could, “a bunch of [white] men . . . went out to where the brothers lived, and . . . shot ’em.” It was a brutal kill- ing, Anders recalled. The white mob “forced ’em into the[ir] house” and “burned the[ir] whole family—men, women, and children.” The murder of the Cabiness family proved so traumatic, in fact, that,

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Jul 12, 2018

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