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Texas through 1845: A Survey of the Historical Literature of Recent Decades

Texas through 1845: A Survey of the Historical Literature of Recent Decades "Incident on the Prairies" from Narrative of the Texan Santa Fé Expedition, comprising a description of a tour through Texas, and across the great southwestern prairies, the Camanche and Caygüa hunting-grounds, with an account ofthe sufferingsfrom want offood, lossesfrom hostile Indians, and final capture of the Texans, and their march, as prisoners, to the tity ofMexico (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1844) by Geo. Willems Kendall. This image shows a party ofwhite travelers surprised by Comanche buffalo hunters. Many current scholars argue that the Comanches were the dominant political entity in Texas around 1845, refuting the idea that Anglo Americans such as the travelers in this image easily hegemonized the region after Texas won its independence from Mexico. Image courtesy of the Rare Book and Texana Collections, University of North Texas Libraries. Texas through 1845: A Survey of the Historical Literature ofRecent Decades By F. Todd Smith* BETWEEN THE 1Q20S AND îgÔOS, HISTORIANS, WITH VERY FEW exceptions, explained the era prior to 1846 in terms of the triumphant conquest of Anglo-American civilization over supposedly inferior races. Despite the fact that Indians had inhabited the region for at least 1 5,000 years, and that Texas was a Spanish colony http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Texas through 1845: A Survey of the Historical Literature of Recent Decades

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
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Abstract

"Incident on the Prairies" from Narrative of the Texan Santa Fé Expedition, comprising a description of a tour through Texas, and across the great southwestern prairies, the Camanche and Caygüa hunting-grounds, with an account ofthe sufferingsfrom want offood, lossesfrom hostile Indians, and final capture of the Texans, and their march, as prisoners, to the tity ofMexico (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1844) by Geo. Willems Kendall. This image shows a party ofwhite travelers surprised by Comanche buffalo hunters. Many current scholars argue that the Comanches were the dominant political entity in Texas around 1845, refuting the idea that Anglo Americans such as the travelers in this image easily hegemonized the region after Texas won its independence from Mexico. Image courtesy of the Rare Book and Texana Collections, University of North Texas Libraries. Texas through 1845: A Survey of the Historical Literature ofRecent Decades By F. Todd Smith* BETWEEN THE 1Q20S AND îgÔOS, HISTORIANS, WITH VERY FEW exceptions, explained the era prior to 1846 in terms of the triumphant conquest of Anglo-American civilization over supposedly inferior races. Despite the fact that Indians had inhabited the region for at least 1 5,000 years, and that Texas was a Spanish colony

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Jul 6, 2010

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