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Texas and the Master Civil Rights Narrative: A Case Study of Black Females in Houston

Texas and the Master Civil Rights Narrative: A Case Study of Black Females in Houston vi Merline Pitre, TSHA President, 2011­12. Article By Merline Pitre* ver the past century, the power of historians to influence the public, to shape attitudes, and to eradicate popular prejudice has been amply demonstrated. The civil rights movement is a case in point. "Although exemplary studies and documentations abound and participants have produced a number of autobiographical accounts, the civil rights movement circulates through the American memory in forms and channels that are sometimes powerful, sometimes exaggerated and sometimes contested," historian Jacquelyn Dowd Hall has written.1 Images of the movement appear and reappear on Martin L. King Jr. Day and * Merline Pitre is a past President of TSHA (2011­12), a TSHA Fellow, and Professor of History at Texas Southern University in Houston. She is the author of three books and is former Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Texas Southern. The author wishes to thank Ryan Schumacher and Randolph "Mike" Campbell for reading this essay and providing thoughtful comments and critique. This article has been adapted from the Presidential Address read by Dr. Pitre at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the TSHA in Houston. 1 Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, "The Long Civil Rights Movement and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Texas and the Master Civil Rights Narrative: A Case Study of Black Females in Houston

Southwestern Historical Quarterly , Volume 116 (2) – Sep 16, 2012

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
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Abstract

vi Merline Pitre, TSHA President, 2011­12. Article By Merline Pitre* ver the past century, the power of historians to influence the public, to shape attitudes, and to eradicate popular prejudice has been amply demonstrated. The civil rights movement is a case in point. "Although exemplary studies and documentations abound and participants have produced a number of autobiographical accounts, the civil rights movement circulates through the American memory in forms and channels that are sometimes powerful, sometimes exaggerated and sometimes contested," historian Jacquelyn Dowd Hall has written.1 Images of the movement appear and reappear on Martin L. King Jr. Day and * Merline Pitre is a past President of TSHA (2011­12), a TSHA Fellow, and Professor of History at Texas Southern University in Houston. She is the author of three books and is former Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Texas Southern. The author wishes to thank Ryan Schumacher and Randolph "Mike" Campbell for reading this essay and providing thoughtful comments and critique. This article has been adapted from the Presidential Address read by Dr. Pitre at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the TSHA in Houston. 1 Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, "The Long Civil Rights Movement and the

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Sep 16, 2012

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