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Refuting History Fables: Collective Memories, Mexican Texans, and Texas History

Refuting History Fables: Collective Memories, Mexican Texans, and Texas History José T. Canales, c. 1909–10. Courtesy of State Preser vation Board, Austin, Texas. Refuting Histor y Fables: Collective Memories, Mexican Texans, and Texas Histor y By Omar Valerio-Jiménez* n summer 1935, Carlos E. Castañeda and José T. Canales exchanged letters discussing their goals of correcting the omission Iof Tejanos from public school history textbooks. Castañeda worked as an archivist, but would become a distinguished professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin, while Canales was a civil rights activist and former state legislator. A lawyer by training, Canales was also an avid lay historian who wrote scholarly essays and engaged in spirited debates with academics. Both believed in preserving Tejano archives, so Canales asked Castañeda to deposit various items in the Genaro García Collection at the University of Texas, which Castañeda supervised. The documents included primary sources and articles about Tejanos’ role in the state’s independence struggle, a rebellion led by Juan Cortina (a great uncle of Canales), and the legislative report from the Canales-initiated Texas Ranger investigation in 1919. In one letter, Canales stated, “I assure you Doctor, that public opinion will change within five years and a new Texas History will be written wherein acknowledgment http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Refuting History Fables: Collective Memories, Mexican Texans, and Texas History

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560

Abstract

José T. Canales, c. 1909–10. Courtesy of State Preser vation Board, Austin, Texas. Refuting Histor y Fables: Collective Memories, Mexican Texans, and Texas Histor y By Omar Valerio-Jiménez* n summer 1935, Carlos E. Castañeda and José T. Canales exchanged letters discussing their goals of correcting the omission Iof Tejanos from public school history textbooks. Castañeda worked as an archivist, but would become a distinguished professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin, while Canales was a civil rights activist and former state legislator. A lawyer by training, Canales was also an avid lay historian who wrote scholarly essays and engaged in spirited debates with academics. Both believed in preserving Tejano archives, so Canales asked Castañeda to deposit various items in the Genaro García Collection at the University of Texas, which Castañeda supervised. The documents included primary sources and articles about Tejanos’ role in the state’s independence struggle, a rebellion led by Juan Cortina (a great uncle of Canales), and the legislative report from the Canales-initiated Texas Ranger investigation in 1919. In one letter, Canales stated, “I assure you Doctor, that public opinion will change within five years and a new Texas History will be written wherein acknowledgment

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Mar 24, 2020

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