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Oklahoma: A History (review)

Oklahoma: A History (review) 400Southwestern Historical QuarterlyJanuary Death Lore cannot and should not be judged as a work of history. The book's study of the formal and informal rituals surrounding death is neither an examination of the nineteenth-century "art of dying" nor a catalogued explication of these rituals. It can only be critiqued for what it purports to be: a description of the subjective impact of death on the living, as told in personal stories. The essays in Death Lore touch on several ethnic groups in Texas, but the vast majority are stories about the authors' own friends and relatives, primarily Anglo, told in first person with occasional accompanying poetry or folksongs, many written by the authors themselves. One memorable essay, for instance, describes life at a Lubbock funeral parlor belonging to the author's family. Another deals with the struggle to bury a beloved pet cat. The final essay, apparendy the author's reflections on consciousness and the supernatural, is at the far end of the spectrum. There arc notable exceptions to this pattern, however; two árdeles regarding the celebratíon ?? Día de hs Muertos (Day of the Dead) among Hispanic Texans focus more on the anthropological and historical underpinnings to the ritual. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Oklahoma: A History (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly , Volume 113 (3) – Jul 6, 2010

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

400Southwestern Historical QuarterlyJanuary Death Lore cannot and should not be judged as a work of history. The book's study of the formal and informal rituals surrounding death is neither an examination of the nineteenth-century "art of dying" nor a catalogued explication of these rituals. It can only be critiqued for what it purports to be: a description of the subjective impact of death on the living, as told in personal stories. The essays in Death Lore touch on several ethnic groups in Texas, but the vast majority are stories about the authors' own friends and relatives, primarily Anglo, told in first person with occasional accompanying poetry or folksongs, many written by the authors themselves. One memorable essay, for instance, describes life at a Lubbock funeral parlor belonging to the author's family. Another deals with the struggle to bury a beloved pet cat. The final essay, apparendy the author's reflections on consciousness and the supernatural, is at the far end of the spectrum. There arc notable exceptions to this pattern, however; two árdeles regarding the celebratíon ?? Día de hs Muertos (Day of the Dead) among Hispanic Texans focus more on the anthropological and historical underpinnings to the ritual.

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Jul 6, 2010

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