No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement (review)

No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement (review) Book Reviews the Mexican Revolution, and the Zimmermann Telegram raised suspicion against Tejanos. At first, he notes, the Tejano community reacted in diverse ways to the news of the war. Some left during the so-called Mexican Exodus, some protested, and others hailed the war as an opportunity to show their loyalty to the United States and Texas. Furthermore, an easing of immigration restrictions encouraged many Mexicans and Mexican Americans to return to Texas as the hysteria subsided. Thus, Mexican Americans and Mexicans alike registered for the war effort, and some five thousand served in the conflict. Ramírez writes that the army's training program had an Americanization component, which for non-English speakers included English-language classes, free legal advice for non-native service personnel, multicultural pamphlets, and efforts to prohibit ethnic slurs among the soldiers. He notes one article in a camp yearbook entitled "Many Soldiers, Many Types: War Made Strange Bunkies, But the Army Made Them All American" (90). In these ways, military service helped Tejanos overcome many of the stereotypes Anglos held about them, especially when the army recognized thirteen Spanish-surnamed soldiers for valor in the field, including five from Texas. World War I thus inculcated a concern for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 114 (2) – Dec 9, 2010

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © Texas State Historical Association
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews the Mexican Revolution, and the Zimmermann Telegram raised suspicion against Tejanos. At first, he notes, the Tejano community reacted in diverse ways to the news of the war. Some left during the so-called Mexican Exodus, some protested, and others hailed the war as an opportunity to show their loyalty to the United States and Texas. Furthermore, an easing of immigration restrictions encouraged many Mexicans and Mexican Americans to return to Texas as the hysteria subsided. Thus, Mexican Americans and Mexicans alike registered for the war effort, and some five thousand served in the conflict. Ramírez writes that the army's training program had an Americanization component, which for non-English speakers included English-language classes, free legal advice for non-native service personnel, multicultural pamphlets, and efforts to prohibit ethnic slurs among the soldiers. He notes one article in a camp yearbook entitled "Many Soldiers, Many Types: War Made Strange Bunkies, But the Army Made Them All American" (90). In these ways, military service helped Tejanos overcome many of the stereotypes Anglos held about them, especially when the army recognized thirteen Spanish-surnamed soldiers for valor in the field, including five from Texas. World War I thus inculcated a concern for

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Dec 9, 2010

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