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Mapping San Jacinto Battleground, 1836-1855

Mapping San Jacinto Battleground, 1836-1855 388 Southwestern Historical Quarterly October The earliest known map of the San Jacinto campaign roughly showing the routes of the Texan and Mexican armies from Gonzales to San Jacinto battleground (marked "Battle"). Texas army campsites are identified as shaded circles along the route. From Gonzales to San Felipe de Austin, Houston turned north and Santa Anna, arriving a few days later, turned south before both armies converged on Harrisburg and met at San Jacinto. Map source: C. Edwards Lester, Sam Houston and His Republic (New York: Burgess, Stringer & Co., 1846), 77. Article Notes and Documents By Jeffrey D. Dunn* The steamship trip [from Galveston] to Houston is unique, and the like of it is not to be found elsewhere in the world. . . . Not far from Lynchburg, where the San Jacinto joins the bay, there is a plain where the famous battle of San Jacinto was fought by six hundred poorly clad and half-famished Texians against a very superior body of Mexicans under proud Santa Anna . . . . Among the passengers were several who had taken part in the battle for the freedom of Texas. As they now saw the sacred ground, their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Mapping San Jacinto Battleground, 1836-1855

Southwestern Historical Quarterly , Volume 114 (4) – May 14, 2011

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © Texas State Historical Association
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
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Abstract

388 Southwestern Historical Quarterly October The earliest known map of the San Jacinto campaign roughly showing the routes of the Texan and Mexican armies from Gonzales to San Jacinto battleground (marked "Battle"). Texas army campsites are identified as shaded circles along the route. From Gonzales to San Felipe de Austin, Houston turned north and Santa Anna, arriving a few days later, turned south before both armies converged on Harrisburg and met at San Jacinto. Map source: C. Edwards Lester, Sam Houston and His Republic (New York: Burgess, Stringer & Co., 1846), 77. Article Notes and Documents By Jeffrey D. Dunn* The steamship trip [from Galveston] to Houston is unique, and the like of it is not to be found elsewhere in the world. . . . Not far from Lynchburg, where the San Jacinto joins the bay, there is a plain where the famous battle of San Jacinto was fought by six hundred poorly clad and half-famished Texians against a very superior body of Mexicans under proud Santa Anna . . . . Among the passengers were several who had taken part in the battle for the freedom of Texas. As they now saw the sacred ground, their

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: May 14, 2011

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