Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca: The Great Pedestrian of North and South America by Donald E. Chipman (review)

Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca: The Great Pedestrian of North and South America by Donald E.... Southwestern Historical Quarterly July ture and may reflect organizational principles identified in other aspects of Caddo society and culture. One of the more timely and informative chapters is Diane Wilson's chapter on bioarchaeology. She uses dental wear, dental caries, and bone chemistry to test for the importance of maize in Caddo diet from East Texas skeletal samples. Her results show that corn became increasingly important part of the diet beginning in the early Caddo period, but that the amount of corn consumed varied across the region. James Brown presents some new and compelling interpretations regarding the function of the Great Mortuary at Spiro. Brown no longer views the Craig Mound as a mortuary mound in the traditional sense, but considers it a geographic and cosmological monument. He suggests that the elaborate objects interred there were made or acquired specifically for the event. The geomorphology of many Caddo sites in East Texas often provide ideal situations for the uses of non-destructive geophysical tools and for broad exposures of occupation area. Archaeogeophysics information on three Caddo settlements, George C. Davis, Hill Farm, and the Battle Mound, is the subject of a chapter by Chet Walker and Duncan McKinnon. The geophysical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca: The Great Pedestrian of North and South America by Donald E. Chipman (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 117 (1) – Jul 3, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/texas-state-historical-association/lvar-n-ez-cabeza-de-vaca-the-great-pedestrian-of-north-and-south-M1un6VH0zU
Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Southwestern Historical Quarterly July ture and may reflect organizational principles identified in other aspects of Caddo society and culture. One of the more timely and informative chapters is Diane Wilson's chapter on bioarchaeology. She uses dental wear, dental caries, and bone chemistry to test for the importance of maize in Caddo diet from East Texas skeletal samples. Her results show that corn became increasingly important part of the diet beginning in the early Caddo period, but that the amount of corn consumed varied across the region. James Brown presents some new and compelling interpretations regarding the function of the Great Mortuary at Spiro. Brown no longer views the Craig Mound as a mortuary mound in the traditional sense, but considers it a geographic and cosmological monument. He suggests that the elaborate objects interred there were made or acquired specifically for the event. The geomorphology of many Caddo sites in East Texas often provide ideal situations for the uses of non-destructive geophysical tools and for broad exposures of occupation area. Archaeogeophysics information on three Caddo settlements, George C. Davis, Hill Farm, and the Battle Mound, is the subject of a chapter by Chet Walker and Duncan McKinnon. The geophysical

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Jul 3, 2013

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off