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Lone Star Navy: Texas, the Fight for the Gulf of Mexico, and the Shaping of the American West (review)

Lone Star Navy: Texas, the Fight for the Gulf of Mexico, and the Shaping of the American West... SouthwesternHistoricalQuarterly January Fearing that northern industrialists would invest in western states instead of establishing operations in the South, newspaper editors portrayed Texas as part of the American West. For instance, the state's newspaper publishers emphasized western images including cowboys and outlaws, frontier environments, stagecoaches, and buffalos in promoting the Texas centennial events of 1836. After nearly 6 million people attended the Texas Centennial Exposition in Dallas and more than one million people participated in the Fort Worth Frontier Centennial, the American public began to regard Texas as a western state with its own unique identity. Thus, the publishers' efforts eased the way for northern investment and population migration. Cox's book is well written and thoroughly researched. Any scholar wanting to study how newspaper publishers contributed to the economic and urban development of Texas during the early twentieth century would find this work a valuable resource. TexasChristianUniversity Kevin M. Brady Lone Star Navy: Texas, the Fight for the Gulf of Mexico, and the Shaping of the American West. By Jonathan W. Jordan. (Dulles, Va.: Potomac Books, 2005. Pp. 398. Acknowledgments, map, illustrations, appendices, notes, bibliography, index. ISBN 157488512X. $35.00, cloth.) Lone Star Navy is a whale of a good http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Lone Star Navy: Texas, the Fight for the Gulf of Mexico, and the Shaping of the American West (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly , Volume 110 (3) – Mar 28, 2007

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The Texas State Historical Association. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
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Abstract

SouthwesternHistoricalQuarterly January Fearing that northern industrialists would invest in western states instead of establishing operations in the South, newspaper editors portrayed Texas as part of the American West. For instance, the state's newspaper publishers emphasized western images including cowboys and outlaws, frontier environments, stagecoaches, and buffalos in promoting the Texas centennial events of 1836. After nearly 6 million people attended the Texas Centennial Exposition in Dallas and more than one million people participated in the Fort Worth Frontier Centennial, the American public began to regard Texas as a western state with its own unique identity. Thus, the publishers' efforts eased the way for northern investment and population migration. Cox's book is well written and thoroughly researched. Any scholar wanting to study how newspaper publishers contributed to the economic and urban development of Texas during the early twentieth century would find this work a valuable resource. TexasChristianUniversity Kevin M. Brady Lone Star Navy: Texas, the Fight for the Gulf of Mexico, and the Shaping of the American West. By Jonathan W. Jordan. (Dulles, Va.: Potomac Books, 2005. Pp. 398. Acknowledgments, map, illustrations, appendices, notes, bibliography, index. ISBN 157488512X. $35.00, cloth.) Lone Star Navy is a whale of a good

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Mar 28, 2007

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