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Jim Crow and Freedom of Expression in Post-World War II East Texas: The Legal Battle to Show Pinky in Marshall, 1950

Jim Crow and Freedom of Expression in Post-World War II East Texas: The Legal Battle to Show... The Paramount Theatre in Marshall, Texas, as it appeared in 2014. Photograph by Carol M. Highsmith. The Lyda Hill Texas Collection of Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America Project, Librar y of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Notes and Documents Jim Crow and Freedom of Expression in Post- World War II East Texas: The Legal Battle to Show Pinky in Marshall, 1950 By David Lacy* hen the academy award-winning film Pinky (1949) was scheduled to be shown at the Paramount Theatre in Marshall, WTexas, in early 1950, city officials censored the movie because white leaders did not want to expose residents of the city to a story that involved an African American woman passing for white and becoming engaged to a white man. This decision led to a firestorm as W. L. Gelling, the manager of the local theater, ignored the censorship order and showed the movie in violation of the city’s ordinance. The case that Gelling’s screening of Pinky began ultimately made its way to the United States Supreme Court and helped in a small way to open the door to change in Marshall and the beginning of the end of Jim Crow in that small East Texas http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Jim Crow and Freedom of Expression in Post-World War II East Texas: The Legal Battle to Show Pinky in Marshall, 1950

Southwestern Historical Quarterly , Volume 123 (4) – Mar 24, 2020

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560

Abstract

The Paramount Theatre in Marshall, Texas, as it appeared in 2014. Photograph by Carol M. Highsmith. The Lyda Hill Texas Collection of Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America Project, Librar y of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Notes and Documents Jim Crow and Freedom of Expression in Post- World War II East Texas: The Legal Battle to Show Pinky in Marshall, 1950 By David Lacy* hen the academy award-winning film Pinky (1949) was scheduled to be shown at the Paramount Theatre in Marshall, WTexas, in early 1950, city officials censored the movie because white leaders did not want to expose residents of the city to a story that involved an African American woman passing for white and becoming engaged to a white man. This decision led to a firestorm as W. L. Gelling, the manager of the local theater, ignored the censorship order and showed the movie in violation of the city’s ordinance. The case that Gelling’s screening of Pinky began ultimately made its way to the United States Supreme Court and helped in a small way to open the door to change in Marshall and the beginning of the end of Jim Crow in that small East Texas

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Mar 24, 2020

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