J. N. Rogers, the Jacksboro Rural Citizen , and the Roots of Farmers’ Alliance Journalism in Texas, 1881–1886

J. N. Rogers, the Jacksboro Rural Citizen , and the Roots of Farmers’ Alliance Journalism in... J. N. Rogers, the publisher of the Rural Citizen, joined the Farmers' Alliance soon after it spread to Jack County, Texas. He started using the newspaper to promote the order in March 1881, and in February 1882 the Alliance named the Rural Citizen its official newspaper. Rogers changed the newspaper's name to the Jacksboro Gazette and distanced himself and the publication from the order shortly before the Alliance's August 1886 adoption of political demands at Cleburne. Photo courtesy of Linda Czarny. Article By Jeff Wells* n 1873, Joseph Noah Rogers, a farmer and a Confederate veteran, moved from Tarrant County, Texas, to Jack County and settled on a farm near Keechi Creek. His first publishing venture was the Sunday Wreath, a religious publication that reflected his Baptist faith. On June 4, 1880, while still printing at his farm, Rogers founded the Rural Citizen. He started the newspaper because Jack County and Jacksboro, the county seat, needed a reliable publisher. Transient editors frequently came to the region, secured bonuses offered by boosters for starting newspapers, printed a few issues, and then departed. A few months after Rogers started the Rural Citizen, the businessmen of Jacksboro offered to place additional http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

J. N. Rogers, the Jacksboro Rural Citizen , and the Roots of Farmers’ Alliance Journalism in Texas, 1881–1886

Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 121 (1) – Jul 12, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/texas-state-historical-association/j-n-rogers-the-jacksboro-rural-citizen-and-the-roots-of-farmers-63iWr6PdWK
Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J. N. Rogers, the publisher of the Rural Citizen, joined the Farmers' Alliance soon after it spread to Jack County, Texas. He started using the newspaper to promote the order in March 1881, and in February 1882 the Alliance named the Rural Citizen its official newspaper. Rogers changed the newspaper's name to the Jacksboro Gazette and distanced himself and the publication from the order shortly before the Alliance's August 1886 adoption of political demands at Cleburne. Photo courtesy of Linda Czarny. Article By Jeff Wells* n 1873, Joseph Noah Rogers, a farmer and a Confederate veteran, moved from Tarrant County, Texas, to Jack County and settled on a farm near Keechi Creek. His first publishing venture was the Sunday Wreath, a religious publication that reflected his Baptist faith. On June 4, 1880, while still printing at his farm, Rogers founded the Rural Citizen. He started the newspaper because Jack County and Jacksboro, the county seat, needed a reliable publisher. Transient editors frequently came to the region, secured bonuses offered by boosters for starting newspapers, printed a few issues, and then departed. A few months after Rogers started the Rural Citizen, the businessmen of Jacksboro offered to place additional

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Jul 12, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off