J. Frank Dobie: A Liberated Mind (review)

J. Frank Dobie: A Liberated Mind (review) Southwestern Historical Quarterly October tions on their heads. One found signs reading "No Mexicans or dogs allowed" in public facilities across South Texas during this time period. But in Orozco's construction, the title refers to the attitudes of early LULAC founders who excluded both Mexican citizens and women. Drawing from a wide array of sources from the Bancroft Library at University of California, Berkeley, the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History and the Benson Latin American Collection at University of Texas at Austin, as well as individual collections of papers and fourteen personal interviews, Orozco offers four key arguments that add to our understanding of the origins and ideology of this group. First, she posits that "Mexico Texanos" (as these persons labeled themselves) were a hybrid people who clung to their Mexican culture while trying to fit into an Anglo American society that shunned them. Second, she persuasively indicates how post-World War I organizations united to form LULAC. Third, she makes a strong case for LULAC's actions as marking the onset of a civil rights movement. Fourth, she contends that in order to understand the origins of the organization we must fathom the contributions of women in an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

J. Frank Dobie: A Liberated Mind (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 114 (2) – Dec 9, 2010

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © Texas State Historical Association
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Southwestern Historical Quarterly October tions on their heads. One found signs reading "No Mexicans or dogs allowed" in public facilities across South Texas during this time period. But in Orozco's construction, the title refers to the attitudes of early LULAC founders who excluded both Mexican citizens and women. Drawing from a wide array of sources from the Bancroft Library at University of California, Berkeley, the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History and the Benson Latin American Collection at University of Texas at Austin, as well as individual collections of papers and fourteen personal interviews, Orozco offers four key arguments that add to our understanding of the origins and ideology of this group. First, she posits that "Mexico Texanos" (as these persons labeled themselves) were a hybrid people who clung to their Mexican culture while trying to fit into an Anglo American society that shunned them. Second, she persuasively indicates how post-World War I organizations united to form LULAC. Third, she makes a strong case for LULAC's actions as marking the onset of a civil rights movement. Fourth, she contends that in order to understand the origins of the organization we must fathom the contributions of women in an

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Dec 9, 2010

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