The San Saba Treasure: Legends of Silver Creek by David C. Lewis (review)

The San Saba Treasure: Legends of Silver Creek by David C. Lewis (review) 2019 Book Reviews 239 The book also considers how styles, tastes, customs, and aesthetic trends have evolved. For example, home designs throughout the United States were not necessarily based solely on original ideas; many home plans were borrowed, copied, and expanded upon by other architects. As Hafertepe points out, “professional architects . . . were willing and able to design houses in a variety of styles, and it is dangerous to assume that the style of a house indicates the identity of its architect” (11). Hafertepe writes elo- quently, assuming that the reader is familiar with a broad understanding of architectural and art-related terminology. He has illustrated the book with his own photography of home exteriors. Although interior photo- graphs would have been helpful additions to written descriptions, the pho- tographs provided are accurate representations of the homes that make it easy for the reader to locate them on corresponding numbered maps at the back of the book. Today we in Waco hear much about the Silos, structures built in 1950 as part of the Brazos Valley Cotton Oil Company that have been refur- bished recently as a shopping area that includes the Magnolia Market, but Hafertepe’s book offers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

The San Saba Treasure: Legends of Silver Creek by David C. Lewis (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 123 (2) – Oct 1, 2019

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560

Abstract

2019 Book Reviews 239 The book also considers how styles, tastes, customs, and aesthetic trends have evolved. For example, home designs throughout the United States were not necessarily based solely on original ideas; many home plans were borrowed, copied, and expanded upon by other architects. As Hafertepe points out, “professional architects . . . were willing and able to design houses in a variety of styles, and it is dangerous to assume that the style of a house indicates the identity of its architect” (11). Hafertepe writes elo- quently, assuming that the reader is familiar with a broad understanding of architectural and art-related terminology. He has illustrated the book with his own photography of home exteriors. Although interior photo- graphs would have been helpful additions to written descriptions, the pho- tographs provided are accurate representations of the homes that make it easy for the reader to locate them on corresponding numbered maps at the back of the book. Today we in Waco hear much about the Silos, structures built in 1950 as part of the Brazos Valley Cotton Oil Company that have been refur- bished recently as a shopping area that includes the Magnolia Market, but Hafertepe’s book offers

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Oct 1, 2019

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