<i>Both Sides of the Bullpen: Navajo Trade and Posts</i> by Robert S. McPherson (review)

Both Sides of the Bullpen: Navajo Trade and Posts by Robert S. McPherson (review) 2018 Book Reviews 229 peonage to the wagon of African American chattel slavery. At two points Kiser makes the important claim that national policy concerning Jim Crow labor regimes changed (at least on paper) because of anti-peonage laws in New Mexico. Yet, he does not explain the significance of the failure of these laws. I think this is because—curiously—he appears to lack a concept of race, and particularly of white supremacy, as the unifying national ideol- ogy of the postbellum United States. In supporting his larger claim that peonage and captivity were nationally significant, Kiser might have allowed the thinking of the great Elliot West to guide him. West’s 2003 Western Historical Quarterly essay, “Reconstructing Race” explodes classic paradigms and periodizations of race and region in the long nineteenth centur y. When exploring the complex hidden histories of peonage and captivity in the Southwest, Kiser is in his element. There is excellent research here that is of value to scholars of Early American, indigenous, and western history. Nevertheless, living in a time when the legacies of multiple types of colonialist violence continue to echo brutally in our present, struggling to be clear and specific about the distinctive lived experiences, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

<i>Both Sides of the Bullpen: Navajo Trade and Posts</i> by Robert S. McPherson (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 122 (2) – Sep 12, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/texas-state-historical-association/i-both-sides-of-the-bullpen-navajo-trade-and-posts-i-by-robert-s-3Wv89slRzh
Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560

Abstract

2018 Book Reviews 229 peonage to the wagon of African American chattel slavery. At two points Kiser makes the important claim that national policy concerning Jim Crow labor regimes changed (at least on paper) because of anti-peonage laws in New Mexico. Yet, he does not explain the significance of the failure of these laws. I think this is because—curiously—he appears to lack a concept of race, and particularly of white supremacy, as the unifying national ideol- ogy of the postbellum United States. In supporting his larger claim that peonage and captivity were nationally significant, Kiser might have allowed the thinking of the great Elliot West to guide him. West’s 2003 Western Historical Quarterly essay, “Reconstructing Race” explodes classic paradigms and periodizations of race and region in the long nineteenth centur y. When exploring the complex hidden histories of peonage and captivity in the Southwest, Kiser is in his element. There is excellent research here that is of value to scholars of Early American, indigenous, and western history. Nevertheless, living in a time when the legacies of multiple types of colonialist violence continue to echo brutally in our present, struggling to be clear and specific about the distinctive lived experiences,

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Sep 12, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off