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Are We Not Foreigners Here: Indigenous Nationalism in the U.S.–Mexico Borderlands by Jeffrey M. Schulze, and: Native but Foreign: Indigenous Immigrants and Refugees in the North American Borderlands by Brenden W. Rensink (review)

Are We Not Foreigners Here: Indigenous Nationalism in the U.S.–Mexico Borderlands by Jeffrey M.... 242 Southwestern Historical Quarterly October properly documented and not subsumed under a framed collection of projectile points hanging on a wall. University of Texas at Austin Mariah Wade Are We Not Foreigners Here: Indigenous Nationalism in the U.S.–Mexico Border- lands. By Jeffrey M. Schulze. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2018. Pp. 270. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index.) Native but Foreign: Indigenous Immigrants and Refugees in the North American Borderlands. By Brenden W. Rensink. (College Station: Texas A&M Uni- versity Press, 2018. Pp. 304. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index.) In recent years, scholars have been drawn to comparative histories of Indigenous peoples who traverse North American borders. Brenden Rensink fruitfully compares the Yaquis of the U.S.–Mexico borderlands to the Chippewas and Crees of the U.S.–Canada borderlands, explor- ing how these groups established stable, autonomous communities; how they both contested and contributed to the construction of national bor- ders; and why their historical trajectories differed so substantially. Jeffrey Schulze asks some similar questions about the Yaquis, Tohono O’odham, and Kickapoos, but he places a greater emphasis on how these groups engaged in “nation building” to achieve “an almost staggering degree of autonomy” (7). In the process, he examines how and why http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Are We Not Foreigners Here: Indigenous Nationalism in the U.S.–Mexico Borderlands by Jeffrey M. Schulze, and: Native but Foreign: Indigenous Immigrants and Refugees in the North American Borderlands by Brenden W. Rensink (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly , Volume 123 (2) – Oct 1, 2019

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560

Abstract

242 Southwestern Historical Quarterly October properly documented and not subsumed under a framed collection of projectile points hanging on a wall. University of Texas at Austin Mariah Wade Are We Not Foreigners Here: Indigenous Nationalism in the U.S.–Mexico Border- lands. By Jeffrey M. Schulze. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2018. Pp. 270. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index.) Native but Foreign: Indigenous Immigrants and Refugees in the North American Borderlands. By Brenden W. Rensink. (College Station: Texas A&M Uni- versity Press, 2018. Pp. 304. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index.) In recent years, scholars have been drawn to comparative histories of Indigenous peoples who traverse North American borders. Brenden Rensink fruitfully compares the Yaquis of the U.S.–Mexico borderlands to the Chippewas and Crees of the U.S.–Canada borderlands, explor- ing how these groups established stable, autonomous communities; how they both contested and contributed to the construction of national bor- ders; and why their historical trajectories differed so substantially. Jeffrey Schulze asks some similar questions about the Yaquis, Tohono O’odham, and Kickapoos, but he places a greater emphasis on how these groups engaged in “nation building” to achieve “an almost staggering degree of autonomy” (7). In the process, he examines how and why

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Oct 1, 2019

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