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Guadalupe Mountains National Park: An Environmental History of the Southwest Borderlands by Jeffrey P. Shepherd (review)

Guadalupe Mountains National Park: An Environmental History of the Southwest Borderlands by... 2009 Article 463 Book Reviews Nancy Baker Jones, Editor Guadalupe Mountains National Park: An Environmental History of the Southwest Borderlands. By Jeffrey P. Shepherd. (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2019. Pp. 227. Notes, index.) Jeffrey Shepherd’s instructive environmental history is a valuable resource for anyone who wants to gain a deeper understanding of the Guadalupe Mountains, its fragile, arid ecosystem, and how humans have interacted with and impacted their environment over the millennia. Guadalupe Mountains National Park, located in Texas, is smaller than 90,000 acres. Confronted with such a limited geographical area, Shepherd frames his narrative within the larger context of the Southwest Borderlands. His focus is a zone bounded by Roswell, New Mexico, 135 miles to the north, the Pecos River, sixty-fi ve miles to the east, and El Paso, Texas, 115 miles to the west and south. After introducing the geology, fl ora, and fauna of the Guadalupes, the author moves to the area’s fi rst inhabitants, who lived here more than 10,000 years ago. Next are Spanish exploration and settlement of the region during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Following the U.S.–Mexico War, the United States sent topographic engineers to explore the Trans-Pecos region, including the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Guadalupe Mountains National Park: An Environmental History of the Southwest Borderlands by Jeffrey P. Shepherd (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly , Volume 123 (4) – Mar 24, 2020

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560

Abstract

2009 Article 463 Book Reviews Nancy Baker Jones, Editor Guadalupe Mountains National Park: An Environmental History of the Southwest Borderlands. By Jeffrey P. Shepherd. (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2019. Pp. 227. Notes, index.) Jeffrey Shepherd’s instructive environmental history is a valuable resource for anyone who wants to gain a deeper understanding of the Guadalupe Mountains, its fragile, arid ecosystem, and how humans have interacted with and impacted their environment over the millennia. Guadalupe Mountains National Park, located in Texas, is smaller than 90,000 acres. Confronted with such a limited geographical area, Shepherd frames his narrative within the larger context of the Southwest Borderlands. His focus is a zone bounded by Roswell, New Mexico, 135 miles to the north, the Pecos River, sixty-fi ve miles to the east, and El Paso, Texas, 115 miles to the west and south. After introducing the geology, fl ora, and fauna of the Guadalupes, the author moves to the area’s fi rst inhabitants, who lived here more than 10,000 years ago. Next are Spanish exploration and settlement of the region during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Following the U.S.–Mexico War, the United States sent topographic engineers to explore the Trans-Pecos region, including the

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Mar 24, 2020

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