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Death Lore: Texas Rituals, Superstitions, and Legends of the Hereafter (review)

Death Lore: Texas Rituals, Superstitions, and Legends of the Hereafter (review) 2010Book Reviews3gg analysis by Douglas Scott, an archeologist with the National Park Service. Using crime-lab techniques developed during his ground-breaking archeological study of the Batde of Litde Bighorn, Scott was able to identify firearm types and individual weapons. Cartridge and bullet type and size allowed the Red River War researchers to distinguish between military and Indian weaponry. Individual weapons were recognized by unique firing pin impressions, cartridge extractor marks, and rifling grooves. Cruse used the find spots of identified weaponry to identify firing positions across the landscape and unravel the sequence of events. While the U.S. Army fought with standard-issue weapons such as the 1 873 Springfield carbine, the firearm analysis demonstrated that the Indians used a large assortment of weapons, most of them outdated, inferior arms including muzzle loaders and bows and arrows. The archeological data suggest that claims of large numbers of well-armed Indian combatants by army officers were often exaggerated: no more than 50 percent of the Indians had firearms and significandy fewer Indians took part in many of the batdes. One of the major contributions of the study is the archival research by historian Martha Freeman, who delved deeply into the National Archives and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Death Lore: Texas Rituals, Superstitions, and Legends of the Hereafter (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly , Volume 113 (3) – Jul 6, 2010

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
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Abstract

2010Book Reviews3gg analysis by Douglas Scott, an archeologist with the National Park Service. Using crime-lab techniques developed during his ground-breaking archeological study of the Batde of Litde Bighorn, Scott was able to identify firearm types and individual weapons. Cartridge and bullet type and size allowed the Red River War researchers to distinguish between military and Indian weaponry. Individual weapons were recognized by unique firing pin impressions, cartridge extractor marks, and rifling grooves. Cruse used the find spots of identified weaponry to identify firing positions across the landscape and unravel the sequence of events. While the U.S. Army fought with standard-issue weapons such as the 1 873 Springfield carbine, the firearm analysis demonstrated that the Indians used a large assortment of weapons, most of them outdated, inferior arms including muzzle loaders and bows and arrows. The archeological data suggest that claims of large numbers of well-armed Indian combatants by army officers were often exaggerated: no more than 50 percent of the Indians had firearms and significandy fewer Indians took part in many of the batdes. One of the major contributions of the study is the archival research by historian Martha Freeman, who delved deeply into the National Archives and

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Jul 6, 2010

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