An Act of Providence: A History of Houston Baptist University, 1960–2010 (review)

An Act of Providence: A History of Houston Baptist University, 1960–2010 (review) Book Reviews (388). Yet there were limits to his vision. He would not tolerate the "maximum feasible participation" of the poor in the War on Poverty to challenge the political status quo. "I'd a whole lot rather have [Chicago Mayor] Dick Daley . . . handling millions of dollars" than private organizations, LBJ said in 1964 (90). And as it became clear that some local people would use antipoverty agencies as means to challenge their representatives for influence in their communities, Johnson was inflexible. "To hell with community action," he declared. Johnson had to be convinced by Bill Moyers and others that they had to "prove that a community can get together to solve its problems" (148­149). It is easy to get lost in the details of these interviews, but that is a small price to pay for a book that gives the reader such a unique view into American public policymaking. There is no better measure of the contingencies that shaped antipoverty policy than these interviews' insights into the personal prejudices and rivalries, academic assumptions, individual aspirations for power, regional alliances, and even wagers on the golf course that determined the course of antipoverty programs. Texas State http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

An Act of Providence: A History of Houston Baptist University, 1960–2010 (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 115 (3) – Jan 1, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/texas-state-historical-association/an-act-of-providence-a-history-of-houston-baptist-university-1960-2010-50nUR7C5rR
Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Texas State Historical Association.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews (388). Yet there were limits to his vision. He would not tolerate the "maximum feasible participation" of the poor in the War on Poverty to challenge the political status quo. "I'd a whole lot rather have [Chicago Mayor] Dick Daley . . . handling millions of dollars" than private organizations, LBJ said in 1964 (90). And as it became clear that some local people would use antipoverty agencies as means to challenge their representatives for influence in their communities, Johnson was inflexible. "To hell with community action," he declared. Johnson had to be convinced by Bill Moyers and others that they had to "prove that a community can get together to solve its problems" (148­149). It is easy to get lost in the details of these interviews, but that is a small price to pay for a book that gives the reader such a unique view into American public policymaking. There is no better measure of the contingencies that shaped antipoverty policy than these interviews' insights into the personal prejudices and rivalries, academic assumptions, individual aspirations for power, regional alliances, and even wagers on the golf course that determined the course of antipoverty programs. Texas State

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off