A Brave Boy and a Good Soldier: John C. C. Hill and the Texas Expedition to Mier (review)

A Brave Boy and a Good Soldier: John C. C. Hill and the Texas Expedition to Mier (review) SouthwesternHistoricalQuarterly January Wooster explains that relationships within the garrison were not as peaceful. The discovery of precious minerals and subsequent feuds over mineral rights, coupled with tension between West Point­trained officers and those who were promoted from the ranks during the Civil War shattered notions of the army as "one happy family" (p. 115). Regardless of these problems, Fort Davis served its purpose, fueling settlement and economic growth that was part of a "frontier empire," though the author is more effective in explaining how area residents used "frontier" than he is with explaining his use of "empire." Even with the growth of a nearby community, the post's future was in jeopardy. By 1890 illness, flooding, and the decision to locate railroads elsewhere doomed the long-term viability of the post, and within a year, Fort Davis was closed, to be reopened only as a national historic site in 1961. Many have tried to write effective histories of military posts, and most confine their analysis to what takes place within the rhetorical walls of their chosen cantonment. Wooster's analysis, just like Fort Davis, lacks these restrictive features. Placing the post, its garrison, and the surrounding population into a larger historical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

A Brave Boy and a Good Soldier: John C. C. Hill and the Texas Expedition to Mier (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 110 (3) – Mar 28, 2007

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The Texas State Historical Association. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SouthwesternHistoricalQuarterly January Wooster explains that relationships within the garrison were not as peaceful. The discovery of precious minerals and subsequent feuds over mineral rights, coupled with tension between West Point­trained officers and those who were promoted from the ranks during the Civil War shattered notions of the army as "one happy family" (p. 115). Regardless of these problems, Fort Davis served its purpose, fueling settlement and economic growth that was part of a "frontier empire," though the author is more effective in explaining how area residents used "frontier" than he is with explaining his use of "empire." Even with the growth of a nearby community, the post's future was in jeopardy. By 1890 illness, flooding, and the decision to locate railroads elsewhere doomed the long-term viability of the post, and within a year, Fort Davis was closed, to be reopened only as a national historic site in 1961. Many have tried to write effective histories of military posts, and most confine their analysis to what takes place within the rhetorical walls of their chosen cantonment. Wooster's analysis, just like Fort Davis, lacks these restrictive features. Placing the post, its garrison, and the surrounding population into a larger historical

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Mar 28, 2007

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