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What Landscape Means to Me

What Landscape Means to Me l a n d s c a p e s (2012), 2, pp. 75–86 © James Bond 2013 James Bond ‘Uses too many slides’, said the report on one of my landscape history lectures by one of those snoopers who infested university classes in the 1990s. My response may have surpassed the record set by former Newcastle United Football Club manager Joe Kinnear in an interview in October 2008, when he is reported to have clocked up 52 Anglo-Saxon expletives in five minutes. For me, the appreciation of landscapes has always been, first and foremost, an intense visual experience, a delight in the complex interplay of colours, shapes and textures, of lines and patterns, of light and shade, proximity and distance, which can be explored, analysed and interpreted at many different levels, emotional as well as intellectual. Of course landscape is best experienced in the field, but failing that (and now there is a serious disincentive against taking students out on excursions in the need to complete forms detailing every conceivable hazard from rain and mud to falling trees and charging bulls) the alternative, second- hand experience through illustrations is essential. Occasional classes with blind students have brought home http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Landscapes Taylor & Francis

What Landscape Means to Me

Landscapes , Volume 13 (2): 12 – Nov 1, 2012
12 pages

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References (10)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© James Bond 2013
ISSN
2040-8153
eISSN
1466-2035
DOI
10.1179/lan.2012.13.2.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

l a n d s c a p e s (2012), 2, pp. 75–86 © James Bond 2013 James Bond ‘Uses too many slides’, said the report on one of my landscape history lectures by one of those snoopers who infested university classes in the 1990s. My response may have surpassed the record set by former Newcastle United Football Club manager Joe Kinnear in an interview in October 2008, when he is reported to have clocked up 52 Anglo-Saxon expletives in five minutes. For me, the appreciation of landscapes has always been, first and foremost, an intense visual experience, a delight in the complex interplay of colours, shapes and textures, of lines and patterns, of light and shade, proximity and distance, which can be explored, analysed and interpreted at many different levels, emotional as well as intellectual. Of course landscape is best experienced in the field, but failing that (and now there is a serious disincentive against taking students out on excursions in the need to complete forms detailing every conceivable hazard from rain and mud to falling trees and charging bulls) the alternative, second- hand experience through illustrations is essential. Occasional classes with blind students have brought home

Journal

LandscapesTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 2012

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