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Verbaliser‐Imager Learning Style and Children's Recall of Information Presented in Pictorial versus Written Form

Verbaliser‐Imager Learning Style and Children's Recall of Information Presented in Pictorial... Educational Studies, vol. 6, no. 2, June 1980 141 Verbaliser-Imager Learning Style and Children's Recall of Information Presented in Pictorial versus Written Form R.J. RIDING & J . ASHMORE While it is very obvious to teachers that children differ from one another in their learning performance, such an observation is of little help unless some common patterns can be found in the way in which individuals vary. The most obvious dimension of variation is that of intelligence. Another dimension is the verbal-imagery manner in which a pupil represents information during learning and retention. There is accumulating evidence which suggests that some people learn and think mainly in verbal terms with little use of mental images. Others use both verbal and imaginal forms of representation with equal facility, while yet others prefer to use imagery rather than the verbal mode (see, e.g. Stewart, 1965; Hollenberg, 1970; Riding & Taylor 1976; Richardson, 1977; Delaney, 1978). The effect of this second dimension may, however, be confused with intelligence in its effects when children are faced with material or teaching modes that are inappropriate to their learning style. It is therefore important to distinguish clearly between these dimensions. However, at the present time, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Studies Taylor & Francis

Verbaliser‐Imager Learning Style and Children's Recall of Information Presented in Pictorial versus Written Form

Educational Studies , Volume 6 (2): 5 – Jun 1, 1980

Verbaliser‐Imager Learning Style and Children's Recall of Information Presented in Pictorial versus Written Form

Educational Studies , Volume 6 (2): 5 – Jun 1, 1980

Abstract

Educational Studies, vol. 6, no. 2, June 1980 141 Verbaliser-Imager Learning Style and Children's Recall of Information Presented in Pictorial versus Written Form R.J. RIDING & J . ASHMORE While it is very obvious to teachers that children differ from one another in their learning performance, such an observation is of little help unless some common patterns can be found in the way in which individuals vary. The most obvious dimension of variation is that of intelligence. Another dimension is the verbal-imagery manner in which a pupil represents information during learning and retention. There is accumulating evidence which suggests that some people learn and think mainly in verbal terms with little use of mental images. Others use both verbal and imaginal forms of representation with equal facility, while yet others prefer to use imagery rather than the verbal mode (see, e.g. Stewart, 1965; Hollenberg, 1970; Riding & Taylor 1976; Richardson, 1977; Delaney, 1978). The effect of this second dimension may, however, be confused with intelligence in its effects when children are faced with material or teaching modes that are inappropriate to their learning style. It is therefore important to distinguish clearly between these dimensions. However, at the present time,

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References (4)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1465-3400
eISSN
0305-5698
DOI
10.1080/0305569800060204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Educational Studies, vol. 6, no. 2, June 1980 141 Verbaliser-Imager Learning Style and Children's Recall of Information Presented in Pictorial versus Written Form R.J. RIDING & J . ASHMORE While it is very obvious to teachers that children differ from one another in their learning performance, such an observation is of little help unless some common patterns can be found in the way in which individuals vary. The most obvious dimension of variation is that of intelligence. Another dimension is the verbal-imagery manner in which a pupil represents information during learning and retention. There is accumulating evidence which suggests that some people learn and think mainly in verbal terms with little use of mental images. Others use both verbal and imaginal forms of representation with equal facility, while yet others prefer to use imagery rather than the verbal mode (see, e.g. Stewart, 1965; Hollenberg, 1970; Riding & Taylor 1976; Richardson, 1977; Delaney, 1978). The effect of this second dimension may, however, be confused with intelligence in its effects when children are faced with material or teaching modes that are inappropriate to their learning style. It is therefore important to distinguish clearly between these dimensions. However, at the present time,

Journal

Educational StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 1980

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