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The Nordic model of Lifelong Learning

The Nordic model of Lifelong Learning This article explores how the so called Nordic welfare state, with its specific institutional make up, handles Lifelong Learning in a time characterised by the challenges of economic globalisation and the hegemonic impact of the neo‐liberal agenda. The analysis reveals a high participation in the Nordic countries in Lifelong Learning and, in comparison to other countries, low inequalities. This can be directly linked to a state that sets a very demanding equity standard and has developed an institutional framework to support this ambition. This model explicitly recognises market failures in contributing to a system of Lifelong Learning for all. The findings support the growing awareness in the literature that those forecasting the end of the welfare state had misunderstood and/or undervalued the important impact of the specific institutions that constitute the welfare state itself. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education Taylor & Francis

The Nordic model of Lifelong Learning

15 pages

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References (43)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright British Association for International and Comparative Education
ISSN
1469-3623
eISSN
0305-7925
DOI
10.1080/03057920600872472
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article explores how the so called Nordic welfare state, with its specific institutional make up, handles Lifelong Learning in a time characterised by the challenges of economic globalisation and the hegemonic impact of the neo‐liberal agenda. The analysis reveals a high participation in the Nordic countries in Lifelong Learning and, in comparison to other countries, low inequalities. This can be directly linked to a state that sets a very demanding equity standard and has developed an institutional framework to support this ambition. This model explicitly recognises market failures in contributing to a system of Lifelong Learning for all. The findings support the growing awareness in the literature that those forecasting the end of the welfare state had misunderstood and/or undervalued the important impact of the specific institutions that constitute the welfare state itself.

Journal

Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 2006

Keywords: Adult education; Implementation of Lifelong Learning; Lifelong Learning; Nordic countries; Participation of adults; Sweden

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