Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The management of shopping centres: conflict or collaboration?

The management of shopping centres: conflict or collaboration? Purpose-built shopping centres are now an important element of urban structures and of retailing. As the shopping centre industry matures it faces questions about how shopping centres should be managed. There is a tension between retailers' need to compete and the need to exploit the cumulative attraction which exists in a shopping centre. Partnership approaches to business relationships are being developed in many industries, but in the UK shopping centre industry institutional factors make collaborative management difficult. Several consequences of a property-led orientation in managing shopping centres are identified, including difficulties in marketing, in justifying expenditure, in managing tenant mix and in sharing information. A customer-led approach can be distinguished in some centres and the significance of different contractual relationships and an emphasis on marketing in these centres is discussed with the use of case illustrations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research Taylor & Francis

The management of shopping centres: conflict or collaboration?

23 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/the-management-of-shopping-centres-conflict-or-collaboration-FCYjSWk9WF

References (10)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-4402
eISSN
0959-3969
DOI
10.1080/095939697343021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose-built shopping centres are now an important element of urban structures and of retailing. As the shopping centre industry matures it faces questions about how shopping centres should be managed. There is a tension between retailers' need to compete and the need to exploit the cumulative attraction which exists in a shopping centre. Partnership approaches to business relationships are being developed in many industries, but in the UK shopping centre industry institutional factors make collaborative management difficult. Several consequences of a property-led orientation in managing shopping centres are identified, including difficulties in marketing, in justifying expenditure, in managing tenant mix and in sharing information. A customer-led approach can be distinguished in some centres and the significance of different contractual relationships and an emphasis on marketing in these centres is discussed with the use of case illustrations.

Journal

The International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1997

Keywords: Shopping Centres; Management; Leases; Marketing

There are no references for this article.