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The Extent and Effects of the Sexual Harassment of Working Women

The Extent and Effects of the Sexual Harassment of Working Women The Extent and Effects of the Sexual Harassment of Working Women PAMELA HEWITT LOY SOCIOLOGICAL FOCUS University of Northern Colorado Vol. 17 No. 1 January 1984 LEA P. STEWART Rutgers University l^inc e the mid-seventies, the courts, popular and academic periodicals, newspapers and books have focused increasing national attention on sexual harassment. According to one estimate, over 150 sexual harassment articles have appeared in print (Blount and Boles, 1981). Few of these articles, however, examine sexual harassment from a theoretical perspective grounded in sociology and organizational communication theory. Sexual harassment does not seem to be a problem of sexuality or sexual desire. Brodsky (1976) found in interviews with a subpopulation of harassed workers filing for state workmen's compensation that the male aggressor did not seem t o want sexual relations or even extended social contact with the female target. Kanter (1977) points out that harassment tactics involve the inappropriate use of power and serve to affirm the position of the male majority in organizations. Other culturally defined low power groups are also targets. A recent study by the U.S. Merit Systems Protection Board (1981) using questionnaire responses from over 20,000 federal employees found that likely candidates for harassment are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociological Focus Taylor & Francis

The Extent and Effects of the Sexual Harassment of Working Women

Sociological Focus , Volume 17 (1): 13 – Jan 1, 1984

The Extent and Effects of the Sexual Harassment of Working Women

Sociological Focus , Volume 17 (1): 13 – Jan 1, 1984

Abstract

The Extent and Effects of the Sexual Harassment of Working Women PAMELA HEWITT LOY SOCIOLOGICAL FOCUS University of Northern Colorado Vol. 17 No. 1 January 1984 LEA P. STEWART Rutgers University l^inc e the mid-seventies, the courts, popular and academic periodicals, newspapers and books have focused increasing national attention on sexual harassment. According to one estimate, over 150 sexual harassment articles have appeared in print (Blount and Boles, 1981). Few of these articles, however, examine sexual harassment from a theoretical perspective grounded in sociology and organizational communication theory. Sexual harassment does not seem to be a problem of sexuality or sexual desire. Brodsky (1976) found in interviews with a subpopulation of harassed workers filing for state workmen's compensation that the male aggressor did not seem t o want sexual relations or even extended social contact with the female target. Kanter (1977) points out that harassment tactics involve the inappropriate use of power and serve to affirm the position of the male majority in organizations. Other culturally defined low power groups are also targets. A recent study by the U.S. Merit Systems Protection Board (1981) using questionnaire responses from over 20,000 federal employees found that likely candidates for harassment are

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References (9)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2162-1128
eISSN
0038-0237
DOI
10.1080/00380237.1984.10570460
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Extent and Effects of the Sexual Harassment of Working Women PAMELA HEWITT LOY SOCIOLOGICAL FOCUS University of Northern Colorado Vol. 17 No. 1 January 1984 LEA P. STEWART Rutgers University l^inc e the mid-seventies, the courts, popular and academic periodicals, newspapers and books have focused increasing national attention on sexual harassment. According to one estimate, over 150 sexual harassment articles have appeared in print (Blount and Boles, 1981). Few of these articles, however, examine sexual harassment from a theoretical perspective grounded in sociology and organizational communication theory. Sexual harassment does not seem to be a problem of sexuality or sexual desire. Brodsky (1976) found in interviews with a subpopulation of harassed workers filing for state workmen's compensation that the male aggressor did not seem t o want sexual relations or even extended social contact with the female target. Kanter (1977) points out that harassment tactics involve the inappropriate use of power and serve to affirm the position of the male majority in organizations. Other culturally defined low power groups are also targets. A recent study by the U.S. Merit Systems Protection Board (1981) using questionnaire responses from over 20,000 federal employees found that likely candidates for harassment are

Journal

Sociological FocusTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1984

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