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The Dimensions of Future Time Perspective, an Experimental Analysis

The Dimensions of Future Time Perspective, an Experimental Analysis Tht Journal of General Psychology, 1961, 66, 203-218. THE DIMENSIONS OF FUTURE TIME PERSPECTIVE, AN EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS.’ Department of PJychology, Clark University ROBERT KASTENBAUM A. INTRODUCTION Man’s ability to conceptualize his future has been taken into account in many theoretical formulations and empirical studies of human behavior. Ex- plorations regarding the meanings and functions of future time perspective (to use the apt phrase of Wallace, 26) have frequently been guided by developmental considerations. Lewin (18) suggested that the life space of the neonate might be described as a poorly differentiated field in which time has yet to become important. The immediate situation rules; future expectations do not exist. Gradually the child begins to enlarge his frame of reference, becoming aware that experience extends beyond the present moment. As the individual continues to mature he gains an increasing appreciation for future possibilities and, consequently, these become increasingly important in determining his behavior. Freud (7) offered a different account of the process by which future time perspective takes hold in the infant. This youngest human being responds to its bodily needs by a restless discharge of motor activity. Eventually the needs are met (e.g., by contact with the breast), and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of General Psychology Taylor & Francis

The Dimensions of Future Time Perspective, an Experimental Analysis

The Journal of General Psychology , Volume 65 (2): 16 – Oct 1, 1961

The Dimensions of Future Time Perspective, an Experimental Analysis

The Journal of General Psychology , Volume 65 (2): 16 – Oct 1, 1961

Abstract

Tht Journal of General Psychology, 1961, 66, 203-218. THE DIMENSIONS OF FUTURE TIME PERSPECTIVE, AN EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS.’ Department of PJychology, Clark University ROBERT KASTENBAUM A. INTRODUCTION Man’s ability to conceptualize his future has been taken into account in many theoretical formulations and empirical studies of human behavior. Ex- plorations regarding the meanings and functions of future time perspective (to use the apt phrase of Wallace, 26) have frequently been guided by developmental considerations. Lewin (18) suggested that the life space of the neonate might be described as a poorly differentiated field in which time has yet to become important. The immediate situation rules; future expectations do not exist. Gradually the child begins to enlarge his frame of reference, becoming aware that experience extends beyond the present moment. As the individual continues to mature he gains an increasing appreciation for future possibilities and, consequently, these become increasingly important in determining his behavior. Freud (7) offered a different account of the process by which future time perspective takes hold in the infant. This youngest human being responds to its bodily needs by a restless discharge of motor activity. Eventually the needs are met (e.g., by contact with the breast), and the

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References (24)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1940-0888
eISSN
0022-1309
DOI
10.1080/00221309.1961.9920473
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Tht Journal of General Psychology, 1961, 66, 203-218. THE DIMENSIONS OF FUTURE TIME PERSPECTIVE, AN EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS.’ Department of PJychology, Clark University ROBERT KASTENBAUM A. INTRODUCTION Man’s ability to conceptualize his future has been taken into account in many theoretical formulations and empirical studies of human behavior. Ex- plorations regarding the meanings and functions of future time perspective (to use the apt phrase of Wallace, 26) have frequently been guided by developmental considerations. Lewin (18) suggested that the life space of the neonate might be described as a poorly differentiated field in which time has yet to become important. The immediate situation rules; future expectations do not exist. Gradually the child begins to enlarge his frame of reference, becoming aware that experience extends beyond the present moment. As the individual continues to mature he gains an increasing appreciation for future possibilities and, consequently, these become increasingly important in determining his behavior. Freud (7) offered a different account of the process by which future time perspective takes hold in the infant. This youngest human being responds to its bodily needs by a restless discharge of motor activity. Eventually the needs are met (e.g., by contact with the breast), and the

Journal

The Journal of General PsychologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 1961

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