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The Computer Determination of Learning Styles as an Aid to Individualized Computer‐Based Training

The Computer Determination of Learning Styles as an Aid to Individualized Computer‐Based Training Most training materials are presented in a way which ignores differences in learning style. The purpose of this study was to investigate the development of a short, computer‐presented test of verbal‐imagery learning style, capable of incorporation into computer‐based training (CBT) packages. The test was validated by measuring its relationship to performance on textual and pictorial learning materials. The test consisted of pairs of words presented on the computer screen. It was anticipated that verbalizers would respond more quickly to pairs that could be answered through verbal associations, while imagers would do so on those which required the use of mental pictures. The sample consisted of 60 school students, aged approximately 13 years. There were equal numbers of males and females. The students were grouped in mathematics according to their previous performance in the subject. The performance of the lower ability group, who were typical of many trainees with lower levels of prior attainment, revealed that a mismatch between their learning style and the mode of presentation of the information made a critical difference to performance in the post tests. To be cost‐effective training must be capable of adapting to the learning style of the individual trainee. This pilot study provides a clear indication of one direction for future research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational & Training Technology International Taylor & Francis

The Computer Determination of Learning Styles as an Aid to Individualized Computer‐Based Training

The Computer Determination of Learning Styles as an Aid to Individualized Computer‐Based Training

Educational & Training Technology International , Volume 26 (4): 6 – Nov 1, 1989

Abstract

Most training materials are presented in a way which ignores differences in learning style. The purpose of this study was to investigate the development of a short, computer‐presented test of verbal‐imagery learning style, capable of incorporation into computer‐based training (CBT) packages. The test was validated by measuring its relationship to performance on textual and pictorial learning materials. The test consisted of pairs of words presented on the computer screen. It was anticipated that verbalizers would respond more quickly to pairs that could be answered through verbal associations, while imagers would do so on those which required the use of mental pictures. The sample consisted of 60 school students, aged approximately 13 years. There were equal numbers of males and females. The students were grouped in mathematics according to their previous performance in the subject. The performance of the lower ability group, who were typical of many trainees with lower levels of prior attainment, revealed that a mismatch between their learning style and the mode of presentation of the information made a critical difference to performance in the post tests. To be cost‐effective training must be capable of adapting to the learning style of the individual trainee. This pilot study provides a clear indication of one direction for future research.

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References (5)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
0954-7304
DOI
10.1080/1355800890260414
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most training materials are presented in a way which ignores differences in learning style. The purpose of this study was to investigate the development of a short, computer‐presented test of verbal‐imagery learning style, capable of incorporation into computer‐based training (CBT) packages. The test was validated by measuring its relationship to performance on textual and pictorial learning materials. The test consisted of pairs of words presented on the computer screen. It was anticipated that verbalizers would respond more quickly to pairs that could be answered through verbal associations, while imagers would do so on those which required the use of mental pictures. The sample consisted of 60 school students, aged approximately 13 years. There were equal numbers of males and females. The students were grouped in mathematics according to their previous performance in the subject. The performance of the lower ability group, who were typical of many trainees with lower levels of prior attainment, revealed that a mismatch between their learning style and the mode of presentation of the information made a critical difference to performance in the post tests. To be cost‐effective training must be capable of adapting to the learning style of the individual trainee. This pilot study provides a clear indication of one direction for future research.

Journal

Educational & Training Technology InternationalTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 1989

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