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Survivor research and Mad Studies: the role and value of experiential knowledge in mental health research

Survivor research and Mad Studies: the role and value of experiential knowledge in mental health... AbstractThe body of knowledge referred to as ‘survivor research’ has grown significantly in recent years, challenging the basis of mainstream mental health knowledge and most recently manifesting in the emerging field of enquiry known as ‘Mad Studies’. The roots of these developments lie in the experiential knowledge of service users engaged in sharing their experiences and knowledge, often through peer support. I aim to challenge some of the assumptions underlying what we think we know about mental health from the mainstream mental health disciplines; and to demonstrate the value of experiential knowledge in helping us to reach a better understanding of mental health and mental distress. This article explores the nature of, and challenges to, mental health knowledge and evidence, drawing on the work of survivor researchers and people contributing to the emerging discipline of Mad Studies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disability & Society Taylor & Francis

Survivor research and Mad Studies: the role and value of experiential knowledge in mental health research

Disability & Society , Volume 32 (4): 21 – Apr 21, 2017

Survivor research and Mad Studies: the role and value of experiential knowledge in mental health research

Disability & Society , Volume 32 (4): 21 – Apr 21, 2017

Abstract

AbstractThe body of knowledge referred to as ‘survivor research’ has grown significantly in recent years, challenging the basis of mainstream mental health knowledge and most recently manifesting in the emerging field of enquiry known as ‘Mad Studies’. The roots of these developments lie in the experiential knowledge of service users engaged in sharing their experiences and knowledge, often through peer support. I aim to challenge some of the assumptions underlying what we think we know about mental health from the mainstream mental health disciplines; and to demonstrate the value of experiential knowledge in helping us to reach a better understanding of mental health and mental distress. This article explores the nature of, and challenges to, mental health knowledge and evidence, drawing on the work of survivor researchers and people contributing to the emerging discipline of Mad Studies.

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References (94)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1360-0508
eISSN
0968-7599
DOI
10.1080/09687599.2017.1302320
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe body of knowledge referred to as ‘survivor research’ has grown significantly in recent years, challenging the basis of mainstream mental health knowledge and most recently manifesting in the emerging field of enquiry known as ‘Mad Studies’. The roots of these developments lie in the experiential knowledge of service users engaged in sharing their experiences and knowledge, often through peer support. I aim to challenge some of the assumptions underlying what we think we know about mental health from the mainstream mental health disciplines; and to demonstrate the value of experiential knowledge in helping us to reach a better understanding of mental health and mental distress. This article explores the nature of, and challenges to, mental health knowledge and evidence, drawing on the work of survivor researchers and people contributing to the emerging discipline of Mad Studies.

Journal

Disability & SocietyTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 21, 2017

Keywords: Survivor research; Mad Studies; experiential knowledge; mental health; service users; peer support

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