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Suburbanisation and Changing Landscape Character: The Example of the Black Country

Suburbanisation and Changing Landscape Character: The Example of the Black Country AbstractSuburbs are home to most of the population of England and form the largest part of the fabric of modern cities and conurbations. But neither their historic character nor their effect on earlier landscapes have attracted analysis in proportion to their scale. The emerging Historic Landscape Characterisation of English metropolitan areas provides an opportunity to address this deficiency. This contribution shows how in the Black Country the growth of what is now the country's second largest urban area has transformed an industrial landscape of distinctive character and historic importance. While suburbanisation has left its own character, it has also thrown a veil over the features which were used to define the Black Country and which are still used to delineate its identity. The article considers what remains of particular aspects of the area's 'classic' period, but also significant patterns from its later suburbanisation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Landscapes Taylor & Francis

Suburbanisation and Changing Landscape Character: The Example of the Black Country

Landscapes , Volume 11 (2): 15 – Oct 1, 2010
15 pages

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References (19)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2010 Maney Publishing
ISSN
2040-8153
eISSN
1466-2035
DOI
10.1179/lan.2010.11.2.45
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractSuburbs are home to most of the population of England and form the largest part of the fabric of modern cities and conurbations. But neither their historic character nor their effect on earlier landscapes have attracted analysis in proportion to their scale. The emerging Historic Landscape Characterisation of English metropolitan areas provides an opportunity to address this deficiency. This contribution shows how in the Black Country the growth of what is now the country's second largest urban area has transformed an industrial landscape of distinctive character and historic importance. While suburbanisation has left its own character, it has also thrown a veil over the features which were used to define the Black Country and which are still used to delineate its identity. The article considers what remains of particular aspects of the area's 'classic' period, but also significant patterns from its later suburbanisation.

Journal

LandscapesTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2010

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