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Statistics Anxiety and the Role of Self-Perceptions

Statistics Anxiety and the Role of Self-Perceptions Abstract The relationship between 7 dimensions of self-perception and 6 dimensions of statistics anxiety was investigated using a canonical correlation analysis. Participants were 146 students enrolled in graduate-level research methodology courses. The first canonical function revealed that students with the lowest levels of perceived scholastic competence, perceived intellectual ability, and perceived creativity tended to have the highest levels of statistics anxiety associated with worth of statistics, interpretation anxiety, test and class anxiety, computational self-concept, fear of asking for help, and fear of the statistics instructor. A comparison of the standardized and structure coefficients suggests that perceived self-worth served as a suppressor variable. Implications of the findings are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Educational Research Taylor & Francis

Statistics Anxiety and the Role of Self-Perceptions

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References (53)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1940-0675
eISSN
0022-0671
DOI
10.1080/00220670009598724
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The relationship between 7 dimensions of self-perception and 6 dimensions of statistics anxiety was investigated using a canonical correlation analysis. Participants were 146 students enrolled in graduate-level research methodology courses. The first canonical function revealed that students with the lowest levels of perceived scholastic competence, perceived intellectual ability, and perceived creativity tended to have the highest levels of statistics anxiety associated with worth of statistics, interpretation anxiety, test and class anxiety, computational self-concept, fear of asking for help, and fear of the statistics instructor. A comparison of the standardized and structure coefficients suggests that perceived self-worth served as a suppressor variable. Implications of the findings are discussed.

Journal

The Journal of Educational ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: May 1, 2000

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