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Retention of axillary odour on apparel fabrics

Retention of axillary odour on apparel fabrics Abstract Clothing worn in close proximity to the human axilla can retain and emanate human body odour even remaining odorous long after removal from the body. Intensity of odour is affected by the fibre type from which the garment is made. Headspace analysis of axillary volatile compounds released from three interlock fabrics (cotton, wool, polyester) following wear were measured using an online monitoring instrument, proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Compounds likely to be short-chain carboxylic acids increased in the headspace above the polyester fabrics after 7 days. This increase was not evident above either the wool or cotton fabrics. The intensity of axillary odour emanating from these fabrics was inversely related to fibre hygroscopicity. The relationship between a textile fibre/fabric's ability to retain and emanate odour is likely to be related to the metabolic versatility of resident microbial strains and/or the chemical and physical morphology of the fibre and its ability to absorb volatile compounds and precursors to odour. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Textile Institute Taylor & Francis

Retention of axillary odour on apparel fabrics

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References (46)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1754-2340
eISSN
0040-5000
DOI
10.1080/00405000701659774
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Clothing worn in close proximity to the human axilla can retain and emanate human body odour even remaining odorous long after removal from the body. Intensity of odour is affected by the fibre type from which the garment is made. Headspace analysis of axillary volatile compounds released from three interlock fabrics (cotton, wool, polyester) following wear were measured using an online monitoring instrument, proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Compounds likely to be short-chain carboxylic acids increased in the headspace above the polyester fabrics after 7 days. This increase was not evident above either the wool or cotton fabrics. The intensity of axillary odour emanating from these fabrics was inversely related to fibre hygroscopicity. The relationship between a textile fibre/fabric's ability to retain and emanate odour is likely to be related to the metabolic versatility of resident microbial strains and/or the chemical and physical morphology of the fibre and its ability to absorb volatile compounds and precursors to odour.

Journal

Journal of the Textile InstituteTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 14, 2008

Keywords: Axillary odour; wool; polyester; cotton; proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS); bacteria

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