Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Repositioning mothers: mothers, disabled children and disability studies

Repositioning mothers: mothers, disabled children and disability studies In this article we set out to review the ways in which mothers of disabled children have been portrayed within disability studies and the more broader academic literature. We argue that within disability studies mothers of disabled children occupy a liminal position because they are often not disabled and yet they can experience forms of disablism. Their experiences can differ markedly from the experiences of mothers of non‐disabled children and yet the consequences and outcomes of these experiences, such as developing a ‘special competence’ is largely overlooked. Mothers can work to effect change on behalf of their children and, in some cases, for disabled people more generally, however, this role of activist mother is largely undervalued. The review of literature presented here leads us to conclude that further research needs to be undertaken exploring and highlighting the ways in which mothers of disabled children negotiate, manage and approach their daily lives, operating within what are described by feminist scholars as oppressive mothering ideologies and disabling environments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disability & Society Taylor & Francis

Repositioning mothers: mothers, disabled children and disability studies

Disability & Society , Volume 23 (3): 12 – May 1, 2008
12 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/repositioning-mothers-mothers-disabled-children-and-disability-studies-thQe6O9SOA

References (79)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1360-0508
eISSN
0968-7599
DOI
10.1080/09687590801953937
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this article we set out to review the ways in which mothers of disabled children have been portrayed within disability studies and the more broader academic literature. We argue that within disability studies mothers of disabled children occupy a liminal position because they are often not disabled and yet they can experience forms of disablism. Their experiences can differ markedly from the experiences of mothers of non‐disabled children and yet the consequences and outcomes of these experiences, such as developing a ‘special competence’ is largely overlooked. Mothers can work to effect change on behalf of their children and, in some cases, for disabled people more generally, however, this role of activist mother is largely undervalued. The review of literature presented here leads us to conclude that further research needs to be undertaken exploring and highlighting the ways in which mothers of disabled children negotiate, manage and approach their daily lives, operating within what are described by feminist scholars as oppressive mothering ideologies and disabling environments.

Journal

Disability & SocietyTaylor & Francis

Published: May 1, 2008

Keywords: mothers; disabled children; disability movement; marginalization

There are no references for this article.