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Reflective Portfolio Writing: a case study of its impact on personal development and professional competencies for training and development staff in the United Kingdom financial sector

Reflective Portfolio Writing: a case study of its impact on personal development and professional... Abstract Learning from reflecting on past activities is recognised as having the capacity to make an invaluable contribution to ‘good learning’, to developing a challenging and adaptive response to organisational and personal demands. This research, conducted in a major bank through the medium of detailed interviews, explores whether portfolios that include written reflections of past practices enhance the value of acquiring a high level National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) in Training and Development for the individual and the organisation. Of the five interviews reported in depth here, all five individuals found the process satisfying but difficult, but only one actually enjoyed the opportunity presented by this storyboard strategy, using that chance positively to include subjective, introspective reactions to practices and attempt an objective appraisal of them. The others, although admitting to thinking about their work in affective terms, felt unable to write about it in this NVQ_and bank context. On a personal basis the NVQs were seen as a way of addressing a regret at what they felt to be a qualification shortcoming. Their lengthy experience of banking life, however, appears to have considerable impact on both developing and reinforcing how they define and structure their working world. They rarely challenged or questioned the bank's practices, seeing confirmation of those practices within the NVQ_ framework. The authors question the desirability of this lack of challenge for both the individual and for the organisation given the fundamental changes that they are currently facing. They suggest that reflective writing can, if implemented effectively, be an important adaptive and critical thinking strategy. It did raise other issues for the authors as to what might constitute effective implementation for the learning facilitator as well as for the organisation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Post-Compulsory Education Taylor & Francis

Reflective Portfolio Writing: a case study of its impact on personal development and professional competencies for training and development staff in the United Kingdom financial sector

Reflective Portfolio Writing: a case study of its impact on personal development and professional competencies for training and development staff in the United Kingdom financial sector

Research in Post-Compulsory Education , Volume 1 (3): 20 – Jan 1, 1996

Abstract

Abstract Learning from reflecting on past activities is recognised as having the capacity to make an invaluable contribution to ‘good learning’, to developing a challenging and adaptive response to organisational and personal demands. This research, conducted in a major bank through the medium of detailed interviews, explores whether portfolios that include written reflections of past practices enhance the value of acquiring a high level National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) in Training and Development for the individual and the organisation. Of the five interviews reported in depth here, all five individuals found the process satisfying but difficult, but only one actually enjoyed the opportunity presented by this storyboard strategy, using that chance positively to include subjective, introspective reactions to practices and attempt an objective appraisal of them. The others, although admitting to thinking about their work in affective terms, felt unable to write about it in this NVQ_and bank context. On a personal basis the NVQs were seen as a way of addressing a regret at what they felt to be a qualification shortcoming. Their lengthy experience of banking life, however, appears to have considerable impact on both developing and reinforcing how they define and structure their working world. They rarely challenged or questioned the bank's practices, seeing confirmation of those practices within the NVQ_ framework. The authors question the desirability of this lack of challenge for both the individual and for the organisation given the fundamental changes that they are currently facing. They suggest that reflective writing can, if implemented effectively, be an important adaptive and critical thinking strategy. It did raise other issues for the authors as to what might constitute effective implementation for the learning facilitator as well as for the organisation.

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References (12)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1747-5112
eISSN
1359-6748
DOI
10.1080/1359674960010302
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Learning from reflecting on past activities is recognised as having the capacity to make an invaluable contribution to ‘good learning’, to developing a challenging and adaptive response to organisational and personal demands. This research, conducted in a major bank through the medium of detailed interviews, explores whether portfolios that include written reflections of past practices enhance the value of acquiring a high level National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) in Training and Development for the individual and the organisation. Of the five interviews reported in depth here, all five individuals found the process satisfying but difficult, but only one actually enjoyed the opportunity presented by this storyboard strategy, using that chance positively to include subjective, introspective reactions to practices and attempt an objective appraisal of them. The others, although admitting to thinking about their work in affective terms, felt unable to write about it in this NVQ_and bank context. On a personal basis the NVQs were seen as a way of addressing a regret at what they felt to be a qualification shortcoming. Their lengthy experience of banking life, however, appears to have considerable impact on both developing and reinforcing how they define and structure their working world. They rarely challenged or questioned the bank's practices, seeing confirmation of those practices within the NVQ_ framework. The authors question the desirability of this lack of challenge for both the individual and for the organisation given the fundamental changes that they are currently facing. They suggest that reflective writing can, if implemented effectively, be an important adaptive and critical thinking strategy. It did raise other issues for the authors as to what might constitute effective implementation for the learning facilitator as well as for the organisation.

Journal

Research in Post-Compulsory EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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