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Problem-based Learning for Police Academy Students: Comparison of Those Receiving Such Instruction with Those in Traditional Programs

Problem-based Learning for Police Academy Students: Comparison of Those Receiving Such... Using a non-equivalent comparison group exploratory quasi-experimental design, this study explored the perceptions of police academy trainees toward their problem-based learning instruction as compared to police academy trainees who received their training via a more traditional lecture-based method. A statistically significant difference was found for only one of four instructional modules reviewed in the study, whereby students taught using the problem-based learning methodology perceived their problem-solving and critical thinking skills were improved more than students who had attended police academies taught via the traditional lecture method. For the other three modules, the problem-based group had slightly higher means for nearly all areas examined, but the differences were not statistically significant. Open-ended student responses and faculty input favored the problem-based approach. These mixed, primarily non-significant findings are similar to research conducted on problem-based teaching methodologies in the medical field, and suggest the need for further research on this model of teaching and learning within police academies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Criminal Justice Education Taylor & Francis

Problem-based Learning for Police Academy Students: Comparison of Those Receiving Such Instruction with Those in Traditional Programs

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References (37)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2014 Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences
ISSN
1745-9117
eISSN
1051-1253
DOI
10.1080/10511253.2014.882368
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using a non-equivalent comparison group exploratory quasi-experimental design, this study explored the perceptions of police academy trainees toward their problem-based learning instruction as compared to police academy trainees who received their training via a more traditional lecture-based method. A statistically significant difference was found for only one of four instructional modules reviewed in the study, whereby students taught using the problem-based learning methodology perceived their problem-solving and critical thinking skills were improved more than students who had attended police academies taught via the traditional lecture method. For the other three modules, the problem-based group had slightly higher means for nearly all areas examined, but the differences were not statistically significant. Open-ended student responses and faculty input favored the problem-based approach. These mixed, primarily non-significant findings are similar to research conducted on problem-based teaching methodologies in the medical field, and suggest the need for further research on this model of teaching and learning within police academies.

Journal

Journal of Criminal Justice EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 3, 2014

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