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Predictive validity of the PCL-R in offenders with intellectual disability in a high secure hospital setting: Institutional aggression

Predictive validity of the PCL-R in offenders with intellectual disability in a high secure... Abstract Psychopathy has emerged as one of the constructs most predictive of violence risk in the forensic field. The Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) has previously been found to have acceptable reliability and validity in a sample of offenders with intellectual disability, but its predictive validity in this group has yet to be established. This prospective study examined the relative ability of the PCL-R and two other instruments, the Historical Clinical Risk-20 (HCR-20) and the Emotional Problem Scales' Behaviour Ratings Scale, to predict officially recorded institutional aggression. A sample of 60 offenders with intellectual disability in a high security forensic psychiatric setting was followed up for a period of 12 months. The PCL-R 20-item total, the PCL-R 13-item total, and PCL-R Factor 1 and Factor 2 scores did not significantly predict any type of aggressive behaviour. In contrast, the two more clinically based measures significantly predicted both interpersonal physical and verbal/property aggression. A primary justification for using the PCL-R in forensic settings is the evidence for its association with violence. Further studies examining the relationship between psychopathy, aggression, and violent recidivism in broader samples of offenders with ID are therefore imperative. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology Taylor & Francis

Predictive validity of the PCL-R in offenders with intellectual disability in a high secure hospital setting: Institutional aggression

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References (38)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1478-9957
eISSN
1478-9949
DOI
10.1080/08990220601116345
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Psychopathy has emerged as one of the constructs most predictive of violence risk in the forensic field. The Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) has previously been found to have acceptable reliability and validity in a sample of offenders with intellectual disability, but its predictive validity in this group has yet to be established. This prospective study examined the relative ability of the PCL-R and two other instruments, the Historical Clinical Risk-20 (HCR-20) and the Emotional Problem Scales' Behaviour Ratings Scale, to predict officially recorded institutional aggression. A sample of 60 offenders with intellectual disability in a high security forensic psychiatric setting was followed up for a period of 12 months. The PCL-R 20-item total, the PCL-R 13-item total, and PCL-R Factor 1 and Factor 2 scores did not significantly predict any type of aggressive behaviour. In contrast, the two more clinically based measures significantly predicted both interpersonal physical and verbal/property aggression. A primary justification for using the PCL-R in forensic settings is the evidence for its association with violence. Further studies examining the relationship between psychopathy, aggression, and violent recidivism in broader samples of offenders with ID are therefore imperative.

Journal

Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & PsychologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2007

Keywords: Psychopathy; PCL-R; HCR-20; intellectual disability; risk prediction; institutional aggression

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