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Practice Effects: A Unique Cognitive Variable

Practice Effects: A Unique Cognitive Variable Practice effects are improvements in cognitive test performance due to repeated evaluation with the same or similar test materials. Prior studies have reported that these improvements can vary with age, education/intellect, and disease status. However, additional information is needed about variables that influence practice effects. The current study prospectively quantified short-term practice effects in 268 community-dwelling older adults and compared these practice effects to demographic variables, global cognition, premorbid intellect, depression, and individual cognitive domains. Overall, practice effects were not significantly related to most demographic and clinical characteristics or individual cognitive domains, which was contrary to our hypotheses. However, since practice effects appear to be uninfluenced by many variables that typically affect cognitive scores, they may be a unique and valuable tool that could be applied in a number of diverse patient groups. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Clinical Neuropsychologist Taylor & Francis

Practice Effects: A Unique Cognitive Variable

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References (35)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1744-4144
eISSN
1385-4046
DOI
10.1080/13854046.2012.722685
pmid
23020261
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Practice effects are improvements in cognitive test performance due to repeated evaluation with the same or similar test materials. Prior studies have reported that these improvements can vary with age, education/intellect, and disease status. However, additional information is needed about variables that influence practice effects. The current study prospectively quantified short-term practice effects in 268 community-dwelling older adults and compared these practice effects to demographic variables, global cognition, premorbid intellect, depression, and individual cognitive domains. Overall, practice effects were not significantly related to most demographic and clinical characteristics or individual cognitive domains, which was contrary to our hypotheses. However, since practice effects appear to be uninfluenced by many variables that typically affect cognitive scores, they may be a unique and valuable tool that could be applied in a number of diverse patient groups.

Journal

The Clinical NeuropsychologistTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2012

Keywords: Practice effects; Assessment; Aging

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