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On the Nature of Cognitive Style

On the Nature of Cognitive Style Abstract This paper reviews the origins of the construct of cognitive style, its fundamental dimensions and their method of assessment. The evidence for the independence of the style dimensions from one another, from intelligence and from personality is presented. The relationship of style to observed behaviours, such as learning performance, learning preferences, subject preferences and social behaviour, is described. Physiological measures and their relationship to style are considered. The distinction between style, which is likely to be relatively fixed, and strategies which are capable of being learned and developed, is discussed. A ‘level’ model is then outlined with, at the primary level: experience, personality sources and gender. Styles operate at the next level of cognitive control. The outer output level comprises the learning strategies. Priorities for further research are outlined. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Psychology Taylor & Francis

On the Nature of Cognitive Style

Educational Psychology , Volume 17 (1-2): 21 – Jan 1, 1997
21 pages

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References (58)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-5820
eISSN
0144-3410
DOI
10.1080/0144341970170102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This paper reviews the origins of the construct of cognitive style, its fundamental dimensions and their method of assessment. The evidence for the independence of the style dimensions from one another, from intelligence and from personality is presented. The relationship of style to observed behaviours, such as learning performance, learning preferences, subject preferences and social behaviour, is described. Physiological measures and their relationship to style are considered. The distinction between style, which is likely to be relatively fixed, and strategies which are capable of being learned and developed, is discussed. A ‘level’ model is then outlined with, at the primary level: experience, personality sources and gender. Styles operate at the next level of cognitive control. The outer output level comprises the learning strategies. Priorities for further research are outlined.

Journal

Educational PsychologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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