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Marshall D. Sahlins 27 December 1930–5 April 2021 A MEMOIRE

Marshall D. Sahlins 27 December 1930–5 April 2021 A MEMOIRE The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology, 2022 Vol. 23, No. 3, pp. 286–291, https://doi.org/10.1080/14442213.2022.2061589 Obituary Marshall D. Sahlins 27 December 1930–5 April 2021 A MEMOIRE James J. Fox* Marshall D. Sahlins was one of the leading anthropologists of his generation: prodi- giously productive, incisive, provocative, and relentless in his intellectual pursuits. His writings span a period of over 65 years and trace an intellectual development that charts many of the principal concerns of his era. His writings also represent a dialogue with many of the leading anthropologists of this time and an ongoing debate over current social issues. In the course of his long career, Sahlins came to use his considerable reading of the world’s ethnographic record to engage critically with fundamental issues in Western thought. Tracing a trajectory through his diverse corpus of writing to identify his contributions to anthropology and beyond is a daunting challenge. This effort offers a personal perspective. Born in Chicago, Sahlins first studied anthropology under Leslie White at the Uni- versity of Michigan where he received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees and then went on to do his doctorate at Columbia University in 1954 with Morton Fried as his supervisor and in company http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology Taylor & Francis

Marshall D. Sahlins 27 December 1930–5 April 2021 A MEMOIRE

The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology , Volume 23 (3): 6 – May 27, 2022

Marshall D. Sahlins 27 December 1930–5 April 2021 A MEMOIRE

The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology , Volume 23 (3): 6 – May 27, 2022

Abstract

The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology, 2022 Vol. 23, No. 3, pp. 286–291, https://doi.org/10.1080/14442213.2022.2061589 Obituary Marshall D. Sahlins 27 December 1930–5 April 2021 A MEMOIRE James J. Fox* Marshall D. Sahlins was one of the leading anthropologists of his generation: prodi- giously productive, incisive, provocative, and relentless in his intellectual pursuits. His writings span a period of over 65 years and trace an intellectual development that charts many of the principal concerns of his era. His writings also represent a dialogue with many of the leading anthropologists of this time and an ongoing debate over current social issues. In the course of his long career, Sahlins came to use his considerable reading of the world’s ethnographic record to engage critically with fundamental issues in Western thought. Tracing a trajectory through his diverse corpus of writing to identify his contributions to anthropology and beyond is a daunting challenge. This effort offers a personal perspective. Born in Chicago, Sahlins first studied anthropology under Leslie White at the Uni- versity of Michigan where he received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees and then went on to do his doctorate at Columbia University in 1954 with Morton Fried as his supervisor and in company

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References (13)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2022 The Australian National University
ISSN
1740-9314
eISSN
1444-2213
DOI
10.1080/14442213.2022.2061589
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology, 2022 Vol. 23, No. 3, pp. 286–291, https://doi.org/10.1080/14442213.2022.2061589 Obituary Marshall D. Sahlins 27 December 1930–5 April 2021 A MEMOIRE James J. Fox* Marshall D. Sahlins was one of the leading anthropologists of his generation: prodi- giously productive, incisive, provocative, and relentless in his intellectual pursuits. His writings span a period of over 65 years and trace an intellectual development that charts many of the principal concerns of his era. His writings also represent a dialogue with many of the leading anthropologists of this time and an ongoing debate over current social issues. In the course of his long career, Sahlins came to use his considerable reading of the world’s ethnographic record to engage critically with fundamental issues in Western thought. Tracing a trajectory through his diverse corpus of writing to identify his contributions to anthropology and beyond is a daunting challenge. This effort offers a personal perspective. Born in Chicago, Sahlins first studied anthropology under Leslie White at the Uni- versity of Michigan where he received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees and then went on to do his doctorate at Columbia University in 1954 with Morton Fried as his supervisor and in company

Journal

The Asia Pacific Journal of AnthropologyTaylor & Francis

Published: May 27, 2022

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