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Job Satisfaction among University Faculty: Individual, Work, and Institutional Determinants

Job Satisfaction among University Faculty: Individual, Work, and Institutional Determinants #8196-Bozeman4-R:JHE 2/18/10 12:27 PM Page 1 Barry Bozeman Monica Gaughan Job Satisfaction among University Faculty: Individual, Work, and Institutional Determinants University professors differ in so many ways from other workers, including other highly educated professional workers, but do they differ in the factors determining their job satisfaction? A valid answer to this question is of more than passing interest. Armed with knowledge of the determinants of university professors’ job satisfaction, university administrators can devise more effective strategies for recruit- ment and retention (Johnsrud & Heck, 1994; Seifert & Umbach, 2008; Smart, 1990; Weiler, 1985). Perhaps even more important, knowledge of faculty job satisfaction may assist public policy-makers charged with formulating national policies for the “pipeline” and the continued health of scientific and education establishments (Boyer, 1990). Furthermore, as industrial research careers become more attractive, knowledge of uni- versity professors’ job satisfaction determinants can prove valuable in efforts to combat the higher pay incentives generally provided in indus- try (Zumeta & Raveling, 2001). Related, since the early 1980s, U.S. fed- eral government and state governments have designed public policies This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation: “NSF CAREER: University Determinants of Women’s Academic Career Success” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Higher Education Taylor & Francis

Job Satisfaction among University Faculty: Individual, Work, and Institutional Determinants

The Journal of Higher Education , Volume 82 (2): 33 – Mar 1, 2011

Job Satisfaction among University Faculty: Individual, Work, and Institutional Determinants

The Journal of Higher Education , Volume 82 (2): 33 – Mar 1, 2011

Abstract

#8196-Bozeman4-R:JHE 2/18/10 12:27 PM Page 1 Barry Bozeman Monica Gaughan Job Satisfaction among University Faculty: Individual, Work, and Institutional Determinants University professors differ in so many ways from other workers, including other highly educated professional workers, but do they differ in the factors determining their job satisfaction? A valid answer to this question is of more than passing interest. Armed with knowledge of the determinants of university professors’ job satisfaction, university administrators can devise more effective strategies for recruit- ment and retention (Johnsrud & Heck, 1994; Seifert & Umbach, 2008; Smart, 1990; Weiler, 1985). Perhaps even more important, knowledge of faculty job satisfaction may assist public policy-makers charged with formulating national policies for the “pipeline” and the continued health of scientific and education establishments (Boyer, 1990). Furthermore, as industrial research careers become more attractive, knowledge of uni- versity professors’ job satisfaction determinants can prove valuable in efforts to combat the higher pay incentives generally provided in indus- try (Zumeta & Raveling, 2001). Related, since the early 1980s, U.S. fed- eral government and state governments have designed public policies This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation: “NSF CAREER: University Determinants of Women’s Academic Career Success”

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References (129)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 2011 The Ohio State University
ISSN
1538-4640
eISSN
0022-1546
DOI
10.1080/00221546.2011.11779090
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

#8196-Bozeman4-R:JHE 2/18/10 12:27 PM Page 1 Barry Bozeman Monica Gaughan Job Satisfaction among University Faculty: Individual, Work, and Institutional Determinants University professors differ in so many ways from other workers, including other highly educated professional workers, but do they differ in the factors determining their job satisfaction? A valid answer to this question is of more than passing interest. Armed with knowledge of the determinants of university professors’ job satisfaction, university administrators can devise more effective strategies for recruit- ment and retention (Johnsrud & Heck, 1994; Seifert & Umbach, 2008; Smart, 1990; Weiler, 1985). Perhaps even more important, knowledge of faculty job satisfaction may assist public policy-makers charged with formulating national policies for the “pipeline” and the continued health of scientific and education establishments (Boyer, 1990). Furthermore, as industrial research careers become more attractive, knowledge of uni- versity professors’ job satisfaction determinants can prove valuable in efforts to combat the higher pay incentives generally provided in indus- try (Zumeta & Raveling, 2001). Related, since the early 1980s, U.S. fed- eral government and state governments have designed public policies This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation: “NSF CAREER: University Determinants of Women’s Academic Career Success”

Journal

The Journal of Higher EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2011

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