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Gender cultures and the gender arrangement—a theoretical framework for cross‐national gender research

Gender cultures and the gender arrangement—a theoretical framework for cross‐national gender... Abstract How can the marked national differences in the rates of women's participation in the labour market, and in their involvement in part‐time work, be explained? While institutional conditions, for example childcare policy, can have a contextual importance, these are not adequate for understanding women's different orientations and practices in combining paid and unpaid work. Rather, we must examine the idea that the social practice of women is heavily influenced by predominant norms and values about the ‘correct’ gender division of labour. Culture must therefore be included in any explanation of cross‐national differences in employment patterns. This is the task of this paper. After briefly examining the limitations of pre‐existing explanations, the paper goes on to present an alternative theorization which conceptualizes the links between gendered natures, structures and action. This new theoretical approach is then applied to a comparative analysis of changing employment patterns in Finland, Germany and The Metherlands. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Innovation: The European Journal of Social Sciences Taylor & Francis

Gender cultures and the gender arrangement—a theoretical framework for cross‐national gender research

20 pages

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References (31)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-8412
eISSN
1351-1610
DOI
10.1080/13511610.1998.9968559
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract How can the marked national differences in the rates of women's participation in the labour market, and in their involvement in part‐time work, be explained? While institutional conditions, for example childcare policy, can have a contextual importance, these are not adequate for understanding women's different orientations and practices in combining paid and unpaid work. Rather, we must examine the idea that the social practice of women is heavily influenced by predominant norms and values about the ‘correct’ gender division of labour. Culture must therefore be included in any explanation of cross‐national differences in employment patterns. This is the task of this paper. After briefly examining the limitations of pre‐existing explanations, the paper goes on to present an alternative theorization which conceptualizes the links between gendered natures, structures and action. This new theoretical approach is then applied to a comparative analysis of changing employment patterns in Finland, Germany and The Metherlands.

Journal

Innovation: The European Journal of Social SciencesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 1998

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