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Effects of Practice on Category Fluency in Alzheimers Disease*

Effects of Practice on Category Fluency in Alzheimers Disease* Evaluation of patients with suspected Alzheimers disease (AD) often involves clinicians of multiple disciplines working in collaboration to maximize diagnostic accuracy. Accordingly, repeated administrations of some common tests of mental status may occur within a relatively brief time period. The effect of such re-testing on subsequent results is largely unknown for many cognitive tasks, despite the possibility that repeated administrations may artificially inflate scores. To assess the potential impact of practice effects on a commonly administered verbal fluency task, animal naming was administered twice within a 1-week period to 111 patients with probable AD and 12 persons without dementia. Non-demended subjects were the only group to demonstrate a small (3 point), but statistically significant practice effect. Regardless of level of cognitive impairment, patients with AD did not show significant practice effects over repeated administrations of animal naming after a relatively brief test-retest interval, suggesting the robust nature of this task in AD. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Clinical Neuropsychologist Taylor & Francis

Effects of Practice on Category Fluency in Alzheimers Disease*

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1744-4144
eISSN
1385-4046
DOI
10.1076/clin.15.1.125.1914
pmid
11778573
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Evaluation of patients with suspected Alzheimers disease (AD) often involves clinicians of multiple disciplines working in collaboration to maximize diagnostic accuracy. Accordingly, repeated administrations of some common tests of mental status may occur within a relatively brief time period. The effect of such re-testing on subsequent results is largely unknown for many cognitive tasks, despite the possibility that repeated administrations may artificially inflate scores. To assess the potential impact of practice effects on a commonly administered verbal fluency task, animal naming was administered twice within a 1-week period to 111 patients with probable AD and 12 persons without dementia. Non-demended subjects were the only group to demonstrate a small (3 point), but statistically significant practice effect. Regardless of level of cognitive impairment, patients with AD did not show significant practice effects over repeated administrations of animal naming after a relatively brief test-retest interval, suggesting the robust nature of this task in AD.

Journal

The Clinical NeuropsychologistTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 1, 2001

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