Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Doing qualitative research: a practical handbook

Doing qualitative research: a practical handbook 372 Book reviews example Hmong and American are properly acknowledged in a sentence arguing for cultural issues to be taken more seriously (33), whereas aboriginal people in Australia are not. These writing issues aside, Part II, which comprise more than half of the total book, is a very solid, strong, widely readable and useful account of design issues that typically arise in qualitative research in diverse sites and settings, including cultural settings that are not necessarily ‘international’. It comprises five chapters of approximately 20 pages each, the first two of which are devoted to ‘Getting started’. The balance of the chapters in Part II are accurately titled: ‘Doing the fieldwork’, ‘Analysing the data’ and ‘Writing up and disseminating the findings’. My only minor quibble is the use of ‘Worked examples’ at the end of the analysis chapter and an unnecessarily long (five page) ‘Key extract’ in the writing up chapter on ‘Thick description’ from The interpretation of cultures by Clifford Geetz. The final and very brief Part III attempts to identify sources of support for qualitative research. The reference and computer software list in this 2009 book is dated (80% of the references are over 15-years-old) and the software http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in Continuing Education Taylor & Francis

Doing qualitative research: a practical handbook

Studies in Continuing Education , Volume 33 (3): 3 – Nov 1, 2011

Doing qualitative research: a practical handbook

Studies in Continuing Education , Volume 33 (3): 3 – Nov 1, 2011

Abstract

372 Book reviews example Hmong and American are properly acknowledged in a sentence arguing for cultural issues to be taken more seriously (33), whereas aboriginal people in Australia are not. These writing issues aside, Part II, which comprise more than half of the total book, is a very solid, strong, widely readable and useful account of design issues that typically arise in qualitative research in diverse sites and settings, including cultural settings that are not necessarily ‘international’. It comprises five chapters of approximately 20 pages each, the first two of which are devoted to ‘Getting started’. The balance of the chapters in Part II are accurately titled: ‘Doing the fieldwork’, ‘Analysing the data’ and ‘Writing up and disseminating the findings’. My only minor quibble is the use of ‘Worked examples’ at the end of the analysis chapter and an unnecessarily long (five page) ‘Key extract’ in the writing up chapter on ‘Thick description’ from The interpretation of cultures by Clifford Geetz. The final and very brief Part III attempts to identify sources of support for qualitative research. The reference and computer software list in this 2009 book is dated (80% of the references are over 15-years-old) and the software

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/doing-qualitative-research-a-practical-handbook-HbA08XOg48

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Robyn Henderson
ISSN
1470-126X
eISSN
0158-037X
DOI
10.1080/0158037X.2011.609670
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

372 Book reviews example Hmong and American are properly acknowledged in a sentence arguing for cultural issues to be taken more seriously (33), whereas aboriginal people in Australia are not. These writing issues aside, Part II, which comprise more than half of the total book, is a very solid, strong, widely readable and useful account of design issues that typically arise in qualitative research in diverse sites and settings, including cultural settings that are not necessarily ‘international’. It comprises five chapters of approximately 20 pages each, the first two of which are devoted to ‘Getting started’. The balance of the chapters in Part II are accurately titled: ‘Doing the fieldwork’, ‘Analysing the data’ and ‘Writing up and disseminating the findings’. My only minor quibble is the use of ‘Worked examples’ at the end of the analysis chapter and an unnecessarily long (five page) ‘Key extract’ in the writing up chapter on ‘Thick description’ from The interpretation of cultures by Clifford Geetz. The final and very brief Part III attempts to identify sources of support for qualitative research. The reference and computer software list in this 2009 book is dated (80% of the references are over 15-years-old) and the software

Journal

Studies in Continuing EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 2011

There are no references for this article.